Villa CG | Powerhouse Company

Villa CG ,a two-storey modern family home, located in Enschede, The Netherlands.

It was designed by Powerhouse Company.


Description by Powerhouse Company:

Villa CG is a family home in the eastern Dutch city of Enschede, close to the German border. The clients, a couple with two children, commissioned Powerhouse Company in 2013 to design ‘the most beautiful house on the street’ within a strict budget. Villa CG is a two-storey home characterized by horizontality. Our design takes its cues from the surrounding low hedge to create a house that is about balance and equilibrium, symmetry and grace.


Design Office: Powerhouse Company
Location: Enschede, The Netherlands
Team: Nanne de Ru, Stijn Kemper, Ryanne Janssen,
Stefan de Meijer, Donna van Milligen Bielke
Interior: De Stijl Interieur & Design
Structural Engineer: Breed Integrated Design
Area: 243,00 m2
Project Year: 2015
Photographs: Ossip van Duivenbode


 

 

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Alps Villa | Camillo Botticini Architect

Alps Villa, a house with an irregular plan shaped like a “C”, located in Brescia, Italy.

It was designed by Camillo Botticini Architect.

Description by Camillo Botticini Architect:

The house stands on a clearing in the trees, 700 meters above sea level, close to the “Passo del Cavallo”, next to a road that connects Trompia Valley and Sabbia Valley on a steep slope. The landscape is characterized by an open valley to the south and a frame of green mountains with peaks of dolomite rock to the north.
We are still in a place close to the urban noise but at the same time far away, where the aroma of mountain herbs and grazing sheep seem to have stopped time; and this determines which condition founding: a primary relationship between the artificial intervention and nature.

The relationship with the ground and the landscape are the material that construct the project: the ground by communicating with the project operates a principle of “rootedness” into the slope to the north, where the house seems to bite the mountain, and the principle of “emancipation “to the south, with an overhang that throw the home to the valley.
To the north, a courtyard open to the Mount allows you to look at the profile of the dolomite rock spiers that at 1200 m above sea level continues the green plane tilted so that virtually close the fourth side of the house.
To the south a large window splayed mediates between the interior of the living and landscape, the light coming from the south continued with a bay window to the north patio.

Lightweight, integration at the site, opening and closing, no exhibitionism, connection to foundational principle generated by the performance of the ground and the internal organization of space, producing an idea of domestic that offers a contemporary housing responsive to the site.
These are the elements that make up the set, with a will of harmony and tension, looking for an architectural shape by the strong expressive intensity, but at the same time a shape of balance and rooting in the use of natural materials such as oxidized copper and wood.

The house has an irregular plan shaped like a “C” with a patio where the fourth side is made from a green plane that delivers the planimetric structure that generates the spaces of the house, creating three bodies with variable height increasing from north-est, where the volume disappears by integrating into the ground.
The first body has three bedrooms, two of them with windows facing the patio, through the bathroom; while the third bedroom has a subtracting that opens the master bedroom and its bathroom to the east into the clearing.
To the south of the second body with a height between 3.50 and 4.50 meters introduces the living room, and open space suspended between the patio and landscape. Its side closed is characterized by the presence of a fireplace that ends with a the same size the south window.
The living room continues with the dining area, to the west with the double height body: a continuous space, characterized by a structured cover consists by triangular planes, inside which is recessed the continuous lighting system.

The highest part of the body in the west is characterized by a loft under which it has the kitchen opens to the patio, while above it there is a space for the study.

It creates an integrated fluid area and open to the outside, simultaneously protected, almost closed on the east and west sides (where they open the window as an excavation of the room and bathroom).

Important the levels of access. The main, covered by the overhang of three meters of living, is placed in the to the south-east. Upon entering there is a ramp parallel to a great room with fireplace. Here goes a ladder to the dining room level and then to the mezzanine, where a skylight opens to the sky at north.

Access by road has two possibilities.
A driveway with covered ramp leading cars in the underground, which is one level below the main floor access. The pedestrian access is constituted by a suspended linear scale made of steel, from the road a space covered leads to the entry level.
An elevator connects the level of the garage with that of the living. Spaces and service areas are located in the basement. The house looks like in his primary relationship with the landscape without other artificial elements other than the suspended staircase that cuts the grass slope.

Geothermal system, heat pump, ventilated walls, creating a natural ventilation even though the deep walls (65 cm) that protect against cold and heat (energy italian rating higher than A+ cened) help to build a house with very low heating costs, almost to consumption and zero pollution.
We wanted an environmentally friendly home in the building materials and insulation, equipped with ventilated walls, a sustainable home in the settlement balance with the landscape.

Green meadows and trees framing the outer coating in corrugated oxide copper and Accoya wood (patented of undeformable wood of New Zealand pine replanted forest), the only elements that, with the triple room glass, are the artifice in counterpoint that interacts with nature.

The ventilated wall copper is modulated with a slight pleating to vibrate the light on the non-reflecting surface. The wood of the great splay reflects light that is refracted from the south.

The patio flooring made in iroko wood, the large windows integrated into the copper coating defines a space that is enhanced by a green maple that brings in a piece of nature, are not material around which you orient the house.

Inside, the floors are made of resin sand-colored, the walls are in plasterboard painted white and ceilings with recessed lights in the graft cut from the slab-wall, parapet are in glass and the windows made of painted iron have the objective of exalting the space and its continuity, favoring the integration to the site.


Design Office: Camillo Botticini Architect
Location: Brescia, Italy
Area: 360,00 m2
Construction Company: Baglioni Costruzioni Slr, Gardone Vt (Bs)
Structural Engineering: Franco Palmieri
Project Years: 2012 – 2014
Photographs: Nicolo Galeazzi


 

Casa Estudio | Intersticial Arquitectura

‘Casa Estudio’ is a modest-sized home located in Santiago de Querétaro, Mexico.

It was designed by Intersticial Arquitectura.

Description by Intersticial Arquitectura:

Acting as both a space for living and working, ‘Casa Estudio’ is a modest-sized home located in a micro industrial area of Queretaro City. The regeneration project saw the building dating back to the 1980s, being revitalized from a state of deterioration.

The firm in charge, Intersticial Arquitectura, chose to approach the run-down structure by understanding the pre-existing conditions. This led to the insertion of subtle interventions including the system of overlapping patios and straightforward construction methods. in turn, the series of patios allow for the house to be naturally ventilated and flooded with natural light. Meanwhile, clay and concrete was chosen to line the walls as it is a local material which carries strength and contrast.
The main challenge was to do more with less: to solve an architectural scheme that extends a studio space on the ground floor, which separates from a new apartment on the first floor, and to maximize the living space, inside and outside. Keeping with the tight budget, exposed materials form the character of the dwelling. as well as displaying a material contrast which in the end works as a whole, this meant challenging construction techniques had to be adopted. additionally, different textures that were locally sourced were brought in. For example the stem of the ‘junquillo’ plant has been dried, knotted and woven to feature in the screenings and rail coverings throughout the property.


Design Office: Intersticial Arquitectura

Location: Santiago de Querétaro, Mexico

Photographs: Intersticial Arquitectura


Lake House | Dransfeldarchitekten

This lake house is located in Steckborn, Switzerland.

It was designed by Dransfeldarchitekten.


Design Office: Dransfeldarchitekten

Location: Steckborn, Switzerland

Photographs: Dransfeldarchitekten


 

Eltham Residence | Patrick Meneguzzi Interiors

This farm house is located in Eltham, Victoria, Australia.

It was designed by Patrick Meneguzzi Interiors.

 


Design Office: Patrick Meneguzzi Interiors

Location: Eltham, Victoria, Australia

Photographs: Patrick Meneguzzi Interiors


 

House in Melbourne | Alexandra Buchanan Architecture

The contemporary home is located  in Melbourne, Australia.

It was designed by Alexandra Buchanan Architecture.

Description by Alexandra Buchanan Architecture:

Covered in trees with restricted access and falling steeply to the river, the site posed a number of design challenges, including Environmental and Bushfire Overlays (BAL29). The form and materiality of the house were guided by the views, orientation, topography and context.

The twin butterfly roofs lift the eaves to catch daylight from every direction and enhance the sense of space and connection to outdoors. The house’s dual ‘wings’ slide with the landscape to create privacy for neighbouring properties while maximising views, daylight and access to external entertaining spaces. A glazed circulation slot creates a dramatic but efficient connection between the two forms.

The generous roof terrace with external fireplace and arbour allow for contemporary outdoor entertaining as the natural terrain of the site falls below, relatively untouched.


Design Office: Alexandra Buchanan Architecture
Collaborators: Hive Engineering, Nathan Burckett Landscape Design
Location: North Warrandyte, Victoria, Australia
Area: 249,0 m2
Construction team: Eco Edge Homes
Photographs: Marvelle Photography


 

Coolum Bays Beach House | Aboda Design Group

The Coolum Bays Beach House is located in Queensland, Australia.

It was designed by Aboda Design Group.

Description by Adoda Design Group:

As former owner of the adjoining property, the client’s imperative was to accommodate a family with the three children nearing adulthood and take advantage of the amazing potential for white water views from the Coolum Bays all the way to Noosa Heads. The challenge was to accommodate a steep driveway from Fauna Terrace, which tucked under the home to accommodate three cars (without requiring excavation of rock), half-storey accommodation above all within the local planning envelope.

Once the site constraints were fully understood, the building form was developed to accommodate the four en suited bedrooms, two living areas plus media room, kitchen, dining, laundry, home office, two powder rooms, workshop, pool and rainwater tank.

From the outset, the client (also the builder) confirmed the preferred floor construction was suspended concrete and the planning was then explored to exploit the best of this material, including large spans and cantilevers. Similarly, the desire to project the roof over the pool and deck could only be realised in structural steel – achieving a dramatic plane which ‘letterboxes’ the ocean vistas through a horizontal aperture.

The client also requested a durable, low maintenance home that would handle the extreme weather events that can occur in this location. As a result of its projection from the hillside, the wind and rain can be torrential, however through clever planning the family room was located at the south east end of the building, providing a buffer, creating comfortable, protected outdoor space on the adjacent deck.

As an informal family, the intent was to have a home that would ensure that everyone remained connected to one another, whilst also achieving distinct public and private spaces. Predominantly, this was achieved by stepping the building down the site, so that spaces cascade as half levels. The only full flight is to the private master bedroom suite located on the upper floor.

Again through clever planning and the integration of operable and fixed sun control devices (batten screens, vertical blades, natural vegetation), the home enjoys wonderful privacy from the street and neighbours, all without requiring boundary fencing.

Living spaces are arranged along this axis, all with access to northern light. A consequence of the steepness of the site was that the only compliant driveway location would be along the northern boundary, with car parking tucked beneath the house to maximise the northern exposure. Living spaces are arranged around the pool, which brings the benefits of cooling breezes and dappled light.

All three en suites are arranged to the west of the house, to act as a thermal buffer between the hot afternoon sun and the main living and bedroom spaces. Windows are kept to a minimum on this elevation and in the case of the master suite, are covered with a feature sun control batten screen over the fully operable louvres.

On the southern elevation, glazing is again used sparingly to achieve vistas of trees and the bays, and draw cool breezes through the house.

On the northern elevation, shading devices range from operable vertical blades to the living; timber batten screens to the study and master bedroom; and a large, projecting cantilevered roof over the pool and deck.

Glazing is generally highly operable stacking sliding doors or louvres and incorporate low-e glass. Fixed glass is used in locations heavily exposed to gales.

The materials sourced were a combination of concrete and steel for structural strength and durability, both readily available and recyclable, and locally sourced pine framing generally, with hardwood used for exposed timber elements. Wall finishes were Rockcote polymer render or James Hardie lightweight fibre cement cladding. Glazing and the feature entry awning are lightweight aluminium. Western red cedar was selected for the battens due to its hardiness.

The home is defined by clearly articulated shapes, the rectangular white master en suite box, flanked by the raking off form concrete ground floor en suites, in a symmetrical composition, capped by the feature polycarbonate awning. Contrast is achieved between the lightness of the upper elements and frameless glass entry door, counterpointed by the heaviness and solidity of the concrete boxes, feature tiled external walls and landscape gabions.

To the northern elevation, the composition is more dynamic, projecting from the hillside out towards the bays, the cantilever achieved with a combination of up and down-turned rendered concrete beams and concealed steel members hidden in the deck and roofs.

The home connects to Fauna Terrace, the bays and to Noosa Heads. At the street end, a steep slope has been tamed with the introduction of large format off form concrete ‘steppers’ and the conscious decision not to fence the site. Separation, as is the case internally, is achieved via levels rather than physical barriers. At the eastern end, the projection of the living spaces, particularly the family room with picture window focuses the connection to Point Perry and First Bay. From the bench seating, views are captured across the deck and pool all the way up the coast to Sunshine Beach.

The aesthetic appeal, whist unconventional, has garnered admirers both locally, who believe it captures a refined and elegant beach lifestyle without being derivative of past methods of creating the typical ‘beach house’, and internationally, demonstrated by the overwhelming request to feature the house in magazines, books and online.

All spaces except the upper floor master suite, which is a full storey above the ground floor to achieve the best of the views, are connected by half-levels, to maintain a connectivity through the house. Furnishings are a combination of contemporary freestanding pieces (eg. living room suite) and built in elements (external bench seat, internal family banquettes, master bedroom day bed, all designed in house). Views of the bays are achieved from the front entry right through the house and all but one bedroom enjoy water views. Wherever possible, spaces remain open plan (master en suite) to maximise the openness and sense of space. The tones and textures of the materials (timber, stone, carpet, tile) are accentuated over ‘feature’ colours, with highlights added in the soft furnishings and fabrics. The form of the interior cabinetry reflects in Calacutta marble and timber the white box featured on the street elevation (in white render and western red cedar).

The two en suites contained within the off form concrete continue the same rugged materiality internally, softened with crisp fittings, mirror and floor tile. These spaces are naturally illuminated with a feature skylight slicing through the concrete.

Detailing took into consideration the often formidable driving wind and rain to provide weather protection (particularly to the south east) to exclude draft and water.

Coolum Bays Beach House‘ was also awarded as a winner in numerous residential categories at both regional and state level at the BDAQ awards in 2013 and won the overall best residential design in Queensland.


Design Office: Aboda Design Group

Location: Coolum Beach, Queensland, Australia

Constractor: Fauna Homes

Photographs: Paul Smith Images

 

Thirroul House | Jason Miles

The Thirroul House, a 1980s cottage with open living and entertaining space, is located in Thirroul, Australia.

It was builded by Jason Miles.

Description by Jason Miles:

This 1980s cottage needed a significant rear addition to create more open living and entertaining space and give flowing access to the beautiful gardens. Upon a heated polished slab we built lightweight framing to support high ceilings and wide-span openings. The internal walls feature unique curves that seamlessly become the ceiling while streamlined kitchen joinery and extensive light and circulation deliver a true inside-out lifestyle. Again, the key to this job was shared enjoyment of creativity and constant communication.


Build Office: Jason Miles

Location: Thirroul, Australia

Photographs: Courtesy of Jason Miles


Naman Villa | MIA Design Studio

Naman Villa, the elegant and luxury Villa A of  Naman Residence project,  is located in Da Nang, Da Nang, Vietnam.

It was designed by MIA Design Studio.

Description by MIA Design Studio:

Naman Residence project locates on the famous Non Nuoc Beach in Danang Vietnam. The Project contains 40 Villas which is categorized into for type of A, B, C, D. We would like to introduce the architecture and interior of Naman Residence – Villa A

This is a very high quality project which inspires us a lot, require the most elegant and luxury design can adapt high standard of living but still remains the feeling of the beach. The idea is mainly focus on how to maximize privacy for every family but still create vast of pleasure spaces with nature integrating the sea.

To maximize the project’s efficiency, the master-plan is well organized but the way is too narrow with high density. Within this condition, our team’s goal is to make a creative and effective design to not only satisfied maximum privacy but also create extra benefits from natural voids and gardens.

Each villa has multi-dimensional landscape with overflow pools and tropical gardens. For every villa, our design also takes advantage of space using by lifting-twisting the upper block for bedrooms with privacy and open views. The lower block with living-dining-kitchen-bedroom has the direct connection to the pool and landscape. Moreover, we put waterscape into the rooftop of the lower block in order to cool down the whole building and improve the rooftop landscape aesthetically.

Density is now not a big problem, every villa has its own garden filled up with skylights and surrounding green environment. Our design philosophy is how to inside-out the initial using space, outside-in the natural gardens enhancing the luxury-home feeling.

The materials used in constructing the house are local materials to reduce the transporting fee and save the budget of Naman Villa. The design of the house is simple and sleek, so the cost for construction is not so high. The house is constructing with Hurricane protected structure but still remain natural ventilation.


Design Office: MIA Design Studio
Architect in Charge: Nguyen Hoang Manh
Interior Design: Steven Baeteman, Truong Trong Dat
Location: Da Nang, Da Nang, Vietnam
Project Year: 2015
Photographs: Hiroyuki Oki


 

Planchonella House | Jesse Bennett Architect

The Planchonella House, a 280,0 m2  home with joyful spaces, is located in Queensland, Australia.

It was designed by Jesse Bennett Architect in 2014.

Description by Jesse Bennett Architect:

Planchonella House was designed with a simple idea in mind- to create a series of joyful spaces to inspire and enrich daily life. Set in tropical north Queensland, the house embraces the heritage rainforest surrounds and utilises experimental passive design methods. The simplistic approach and use of Lo-Fi technologies results in a raw and honest dwelling.

Contours of the site ridgeline have formed basis for the playful lines utilised in concrete profiles. As not to protrude out with the ridge, the profile is mirrored and cuts back in to the ridge. Visual amenity from surrounding lower areas has been maintained with this design in that rather than creating a dominant form on the landscape, it tucks back in at the critical highest most revealing point. The wings created each side of the ridge float into the surrounding rainforest and become part of the tree canopy.

The large flat roof with generous overhang acts as a rainforest canopy above, minimal walls and columns in between allow for un-obstructed views and moments to be shared with the landscape. This omission of boundaries between inside and outside gives an openness and quality of space that is surreal, living completely within and engulfed by a beautiful landscape. The resolution of plan follows a purely functional approach to use of space, privacy, visual connection and passive design principles.

The plan wraps around the courtyard space, which is considered the second hearth (after the kitchen) or perhaps lungs to the entire dwelling. The courtyard contributes much to the house and its occupants, it is an oasis that provides sun, light, ventilation, happiness, activity, visual stimulation, and entertainment. It also provides connection to the surrounding rainforest, connection from one part of the house to another, and acts as the focal node to the promenade experience of moving through the house.


Design Office: Jesse Bennett Architect
Location: Queensland, Australia
Interior Designer: Anne-Marie Campagnolo
Area: 280.0 m2
Project Year: 2014
Photographs: Sean Fennessy


Stone House | Slee & Co. Architects

The Stone House, a home for a young family, is located in Pretoria, South Africa.

It was designed by Slee & Co. Architects.

Description by Slee & Co. Architects:

We were commissioned to design a home for a young family with two adventurous boys. The clients bought a hectare stand in a rural estate with a ‘koppie’ (a small hill rising up from the African veld) and a magnificent view over the landscape to the east of Pretoria. They wanted a home where all of this could become part of their lives. The design consists of a series of over scaled, red, “ysterklip” walls reminiscent of the dry-packed kraal walls in and around Pretoria. These stone walls, housing all the services, were staggered and positioned in such a way to create sheltered spaces between them; privacy from the neighbors on the sides and their main function to concentrate and frame the important east and the west views. All the stone were collected from the site. Carefully placed roof lights allows north light to wash into the house against the stonewalls, compensating for the east/west orientation of the site. To the west the home opens up to the koppie where the kids have their tree house and secret forest hides. To the east the house concentrates on the magnificent views down the axis of the red stonewalls. The veldt was re-established and allowed to grow back, the kitchen garden and children play lawn to the back of the home and the private court gardens at the bathrooms are the only areas cultivated. The stone wall at the entrance leads you in from the south with an entrance gallery intersecting all the stone walls and spaces beyond, drama is added with light streaming in from the top and views confronting you to the right and left upon entering their spaces. The first space you intersect is the main living space, the dining room facing the koppie on the west and open plan kitchen hidden in the stonewall. To the east the living room extends out onto a covered terrace and open fire ring terrace with the view as its focus. The second space belongs to the kids with their bedrooms leading off their koppie. The rumpus room opens up onto the exercise lap pool framed by the stonewalls growing out of the water. The third, and more private, space belongs to the main bedroom suite, gym and guestroom/studio all with their private court gardens and bathrooms. Relaxed-muted, low maintenance finishes are used throughout with the red stone complimenting the client’s love for colour and texture. Sandstone planks are used in the bathrooms and outside areas where a non-slip surface is required. Granolithic floors make up the rest of the floor areas.


Design Office: Slee & Co. Architects
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Project Year: 2007
Photographs: Slee & Co. Architects


House in Linderos | Cristian Hrdalo Architects

House in Linderos located in Chile.

It was designed by Cristian Hrdalo Architects.

 


Design Office: Cristian Hrdalo Architects
Location: Linderos, Chile
Area: 780.0 m2
Project Year: 2014
Photographs: Nico Saieh


 

 

 

Eco House | BXBstudio Bogusław Barnaś

Eco House located in South Poland.

It was designed by  BXBstudio Bogusław Barnaś.

Description by BXBstudio Bogusław Barnaś:

This project of sustainable house is located in the protected landscape area Nature 2000, surrounded by beech and oak forests, horse riding meadows and agricultural lands.

The building is designed in way to optimize the energy gains and losses. Sustainability of the house comes not only from unique technology but also through architectural form and shape that harmonizes with nature. Simulations of the sun position in a different period of the year allowed to create proper arrangement of the house layout and glass partition in way to gain heat in winter and to reduce overworming in summertime.

The house will be build in the Izodom technology. This is energy efficient and eco-friendly technologie that allows to minimize heat loss.


Design Office:: BXBstudio Bogusław Barnaś
Collaboration: Dominika Ropek
Consultations: Wiesław Ziembla
Location: South Poland
Project Year: 2012
Total area: 212.0 m2
Photographs: Courtesy of BXBstudio, Tomasz Jedrzejczak


 

 

 

 

Fitzroy Loft | Architects EAT

Fitzroy Loft  located in Melbourne, Australia.

It was designed by Architects EAT.

Description by Architects EAT:

This project is a conversion of a gritty 250m2 brick warehouse in the old industrial area of Fitroy into a family home. The former industrial building is a mixture of intimately scaled family spaces and vast entertaining voids. Two full height voids act as the lungs of the design bringing both light and sky views deep into the internal space. The private areas such as the study and bedroom are accommodated on the first floor by volumes of a more intimate scale.
The Fitzroy Loft was the Winner of 2016 Australian Interior Design Award for Residential Design.


Design Office: Architects EAT
Location
: Melbourne, Australia
Area: 250.0 m2
Completed Year: 2015
Photographs: Derek Swalwell


 

FH1 House | KVDA Architects

FH1 House located in Norway.

It was designed by KVDA Architects.

Description by KVDA Architects:

The house was designed for temporary and permanent stay. It is locate in Norway, just near the water. Given the location and the steep plot it had been desirable that the house be dug into the landscape, so it would act as an element integrated into the nature. The design of the house allows a close interaction with the surrounding nature and the beautiful scenery. It provides a feeling of being outdoor when inside. South-facing glazed openings from floor to ceiling provides ample daylight. Veranda can transform if we need to save important temperature in the cold season. Interior has high capability and naturalness. The house has necessary space for life. There is common space includes a kitchen, living room with a fireplace and bedroom, so there is a bathroom and technical room.


Design Office: KVDA Architects
Location: Norway
Project Year: 2016
Area
: 70 m2


Joly House | Stu/D/O Architects

The Joly House is located in Bangkok, Thailand.

It was designed by Stu/D/O Architects.

Description by Stu/D/O Architects:

This three-story house for a family of four has a footprint of 250 square meters and a height of 11 meters. It is located on the street corner in one of the most exquisite and densely populated residential areas of Bangkok. Flanked by rows of shophouses,main living spaces are elevated to the second floor to improve the visual conditions and allow rooms for service spaces on ground. Upon arrival, one is greeted with the skylights, through which shown the rippling strips of caustic patterns resulting from the interplay between lights and water of the swimming pool above. The changing time of the day contributes to the changing color of lights, making this parking space- the arrival space, more dynamic.

Built mainly with reinforced concrete structure and a partial steel frame, the project’s exterior is comprised of natural materials such as wood louver, glass panels, and exposed concrete. The more private spaces- the bedrooms, are located on the 3rd floor which external envelope is cladded with timber slats, giving extra privacy and security. This double-skinned façade acts as a sunshade, reducing the amount of heat collected in the building. Some of the slats are open-able panels; which, when opened, create wind walls and encourage natural ventilation. When the Jolys are away, the panels can be completely shut to protect their belongings from the heat and solar damage. While serving environmental purposes, the timber slats also add a warm but modern look to the house.


Design Office: Stu/D/O Architects
Interior Architect: Attapon Wiboonyanon
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
Area: 750.0 m2
Project Year: 2014
Structural Engineer: .N.G. Engineering Ordinary Partnerships
Photographs: Krisada Boonchaleow, Courtesy of Stu/D/O Architects, Chanin Limapornvanich


 

 

Toro Canyon House | Bestor Architecture

Toro Canyon House located in Santa Barbara Country, Usa.

It was designed by Bestor Architecture.

Description by Bestor Architecture:

The owners wanted to build a getaway house outside of Los Angeles where they could entertain and find a balance between the modern design they desired and a more direct relationship to nature. After a two year search in the Southern California region they discovered pristine acreage near Montecito at the top of a mountain and adjacent to national park land. The site strategy is one of slow revelation and discovery of the house and- ultimately- the view. The road, which had to be built for access, brings the visitor to a point below the house- where a formal stair leads up to the entry sequence. The front door frames and reveals views of the Santa Barbara coastline through the courtyard. A 40’ wide horizontal ‘panavison’-esque opening gives the house a pavilion-like atmosphere. The dwelling is organized around three courtyards; the primary one at the heart of the house also serves as the front entrance and outdoor living room. The courtyards have a dual purpose: they bring in ample natural light and ventilation but also provide protection from the strong winds that can race across the mountain. The rough and very thick boardform concrete walls, custom color-mixed to match the dark red and brown tones of the earth at the site, form a rugged shell that is punctuated by large openings and reveals of the Alaskan cedar wood siding. The inner shell’s warm wood and windows into the protected courtyards create a warm and tactile interior respite from the hardy environment.


Design Office             : Bestor Architecture  
Interior Designer      : The Archers
Landscape Architect: Isabelle Greene & Associates
Lighting Designer    : Dan Weinreber, Kaplan, Gehring, McCarroll Architectural Lighting
Contractor                  : Below Magid Construction
Location                      : Santa Barbara County, CA, USA
Project Year                : 2012
Photographs              : Laure Joliet


Garden House | DCPP Αrquitectos

Garden House located in Mexico.

It was designed by DCPP Αrquitectos.

Description by DCPP Αrquitectos:

Garden House is a residential project located in an enclosed area of the San Angel neighborhood in Mexico City.
The house is designed with two facades, one of them very closed to the neighborhood, and the other one much more open to a back garden which also faces south.
Most of the house is designed on a single level, with a guest or play room and service room on the second level.
The house is divided into 3 blocks on the ground floor, one for the most private area, another for the public area and another for services.
With this, the house is open to the garden in an L-shaped scheme, with a single perpendicular component that houses the living and dining rooms, this body of the house is transparent on both sides and can be fully opened, the enclosures can be hidden, thus creating a space with a terrace condition, where interior and exterior become blurred creating a visual continuity in the garden.
To avoid placing supports in this area as in the private area, we chose to integrate steel beams, which keep the clear open and also function as parasols.
In contrast, the service area is much more massive and closed. As a whole, this gives a unique twist to the house, and a variant play of shadows.


Design Office: DCPP Αrquitectos
Location: Mexico
Area: 530.00 m2
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Rafael Gamo


The Barrancas House | Ezequiel Farca architecture & design

The Barrancas House is located in Mexico City, Mexico.

It was design by Ezequiel Farca architecture & design in 2014.


Description by Ezequiel Farca:

The Barrancas House is the result of the restoration of a house built in the seventies in Mexico City, which didn´t have any attract at first but had great spatial potential.

It became a challenge for our office to create a home focusing on incredible attention to detail, modernity and discovery of the different spaces and levels to generate expectation and surprise.

We took advantage of the location of the house that has views towards the woods so we installed floor to ceiling windows so that natural elements from the exterior such as natural light, views to the woods become part of the interior without compromising the comfort and intimacy of the inhabitants.

The amenities for the family to enjoy inside the privacy of their home include a home theater, a wine cellar, a gym, 2 terraces, a pool, garden and green areas.

Discovering the house through the hallways, leads to multifunctional impredictible spaces achieved through movable screen walls , hidden doors, bay windows that open entirely, furniture designed especially for each space, automatic lightening system, for each need of the inhabitants.

The landscape was designed with plants that adjust to the local clima, with green roof and green walls, it also has a solar energy system and a automatized water saving system.

The materials used include marble, stone, wood, together with neutral tones as dark green or chocolate that give an earthy feeling that will integrate the interior with the exterior and create the sensation of unlimited space.


Design Office  : Ezequiel Farca architecture & design
Location           : Mexico City, Mexico
Architects        : Ezequiel Farca, Cristina Grappin, Fernanda de la Mora
Area                   : 720.00 m2
Project Year     : 2014

Photographs    : Jaime Navarro, Roland Halbe


B.A. Apartment | Atelier Data

B.A. Apartment located in Lisbon, Portugal.

It was designed by Atelier Data in 2016.

Description by Atelier Data:

Set in a Lisbon neighbourhood from the thirties, the apartment occupies the last two floors of a building, benefiting from views that from northeast are headed by urban landscape and from southeast, in turn, are dominated by great canopies of trees that inhabit a secular garden near by the building.
The strategic position of the apartment due to his urban context in articulation with domestic space issues prompted the project to focus on the following principles:
Spatial and functional readaptation in order to explore crossed views, communicability and continuity of and between spaces in active articulation with the pre-existing constrains;
Program organization and distribution through a logic that promotes clear distinction between social areas [terrace, living room, dinning room, kitchen, library] from service areas [laundry, wc, vertical accesses] on the groundfloor and private area [bedrooms] on the 1st floor.
Concentration of infrastructures, equipment and storage into functional walls and cores, in order to free up space.
Enrichment of the relation between interior and exterior through the redesign of the openings, emphasizing the connection between those areas
Selection of materials that reinforce the natural light of the overall spaces through the extensive use of white color in articulation with the wood pavements and the ceramic tiles of the terrace.
Insertion of the “natural” as an element brought in from the secular garden, that is interpreted and reinvented into domestic environment;

MAIN ELEMENTS OF THE SPACE

THE WALL

Commited to create a unique living space, the large functional Wall, with its 11.5 meters long,(which concentrate equipment, storage, cooking area etc.) works simultaneously as scenario and as an operating background to support the diverse and multiple actions of the social space.
Mutable in its usage conditions, it allows various interactions and different hierarchies between spaces.
Panels that open to reveal the stairs and close to privatize the rooms, panels that open while cooking and close when the kitchen becomes an workspace, panels that extend or gather inside the cabinets gap to individualize spaces, and so are manageable from this structuring as an unifying element of the space.

THE LIVING ROOM CEILING

If the Great wall, with its vertical expression, ensures the spatial continuity, also the design of ceiling contributes to this notion of extension and unification.
The rhythm of the beams that make up the horizontal plan of the social area, thus reinforces the initial and intuitive desire to create a large space, that goes through the full depth of the apartment, and is crossed by diverse environments, uses and actions.


Design Office   : Atelier Data
Location            : Lisbon, Portugal
Project Year      :2016
Photographs     : Richard John Saymour