Alps Villa | Camillo Botticini Architect

Alps Villa, a house with an irregular plan shaped like a “C”, located in Brescia, Italy.

It was designed by Camillo Botticini Architect.

Description by Camillo Botticini Architect:

The house stands on a clearing in the trees, 700 meters above sea level, close to the “Passo del Cavallo”, next to a road that connects Trompia Valley and Sabbia Valley on a steep slope. The landscape is characterized by an open valley to the south and a frame of green mountains with peaks of dolomite rock to the north.
We are still in a place close to the urban noise but at the same time far away, where the aroma of mountain herbs and grazing sheep seem to have stopped time; and this determines which condition founding: a primary relationship between the artificial intervention and nature.

The relationship with the ground and the landscape are the material that construct the project: the ground by communicating with the project operates a principle of “rootedness” into the slope to the north, where the house seems to bite the mountain, and the principle of “emancipation “to the south, with an overhang that throw the home to the valley.
To the north, a courtyard open to the Mount allows you to look at the profile of the dolomite rock spiers that at 1200 m above sea level continues the green plane tilted so that virtually close the fourth side of the house.
To the south a large window splayed mediates between the interior of the living and landscape, the light coming from the south continued with a bay window to the north patio.

Lightweight, integration at the site, opening and closing, no exhibitionism, connection to foundational principle generated by the performance of the ground and the internal organization of space, producing an idea of domestic that offers a contemporary housing responsive to the site.
These are the elements that make up the set, with a will of harmony and tension, looking for an architectural shape by the strong expressive intensity, but at the same time a shape of balance and rooting in the use of natural materials such as oxidized copper and wood.

The house has an irregular plan shaped like a “C” with a patio where the fourth side is made from a green plane that delivers the planimetric structure that generates the spaces of the house, creating three bodies with variable height increasing from north-est, where the volume disappears by integrating into the ground.
The first body has three bedrooms, two of them with windows facing the patio, through the bathroom; while the third bedroom has a subtracting that opens the master bedroom and its bathroom to the east into the clearing.
To the south of the second body with a height between 3.50 and 4.50 meters introduces the living room, and open space suspended between the patio and landscape. Its side closed is characterized by the presence of a fireplace that ends with a the same size the south window.
The living room continues with the dining area, to the west with the double height body: a continuous space, characterized by a structured cover consists by triangular planes, inside which is recessed the continuous lighting system.

The highest part of the body in the west is characterized by a loft under which it has the kitchen opens to the patio, while above it there is a space for the study.

It creates an integrated fluid area and open to the outside, simultaneously protected, almost closed on the east and west sides (where they open the window as an excavation of the room and bathroom).

Important the levels of access. The main, covered by the overhang of three meters of living, is placed in the to the south-east. Upon entering there is a ramp parallel to a great room with fireplace. Here goes a ladder to the dining room level and then to the mezzanine, where a skylight opens to the sky at north.

Access by road has two possibilities.
A driveway with covered ramp leading cars in the underground, which is one level below the main floor access. The pedestrian access is constituted by a suspended linear scale made of steel, from the road a space covered leads to the entry level.
An elevator connects the level of the garage with that of the living. Spaces and service areas are located in the basement. The house looks like in his primary relationship with the landscape without other artificial elements other than the suspended staircase that cuts the grass slope.

Geothermal system, heat pump, ventilated walls, creating a natural ventilation even though the deep walls (65 cm) that protect against cold and heat (energy italian rating higher than A+ cened) help to build a house with very low heating costs, almost to consumption and zero pollution.
We wanted an environmentally friendly home in the building materials and insulation, equipped with ventilated walls, a sustainable home in the settlement balance with the landscape.

Green meadows and trees framing the outer coating in corrugated oxide copper and Accoya wood (patented of undeformable wood of New Zealand pine replanted forest), the only elements that, with the triple room glass, are the artifice in counterpoint that interacts with nature.

The ventilated wall copper is modulated with a slight pleating to vibrate the light on the non-reflecting surface. The wood of the great splay reflects light that is refracted from the south.

The patio flooring made in iroko wood, the large windows integrated into the copper coating defines a space that is enhanced by a green maple that brings in a piece of nature, are not material around which you orient the house.

Inside, the floors are made of resin sand-colored, the walls are in plasterboard painted white and ceilings with recessed lights in the graft cut from the slab-wall, parapet are in glass and the windows made of painted iron have the objective of exalting the space and its continuity, favoring the integration to the site.


Design Office: Camillo Botticini Architect
Location: Brescia, Italy
Area: 360,00 m2
Construction Company: Baglioni Costruzioni Slr, Gardone Vt (Bs)
Structural Engineering: Franco Palmieri
Project Years: 2012 – 2014
Photographs: Nicolo Galeazzi


 

Fitzroy Loft | Architects EAT

Fitzroy Loft  located in Melbourne, Australia.

It was designed by Architects EAT.

Description by Architects EAT:

This project is a conversion of a gritty 250m2 brick warehouse in the old industrial area of Fitroy into a family home. The former industrial building is a mixture of intimately scaled family spaces and vast entertaining voids. Two full height voids act as the lungs of the design bringing both light and sky views deep into the internal space. The private areas such as the study and bedroom are accommodated on the first floor by volumes of a more intimate scale.
The Fitzroy Loft was the Winner of 2016 Australian Interior Design Award for Residential Design.


Design Office: Architects EAT
Location
: Melbourne, Australia
Area: 250.0 m2
Completed Year: 2015
Photographs: Derek Swalwell


 

Joly House | Stu/D/O Architects

The Joly House is located in Bangkok, Thailand.

It was designed by Stu/D/O Architects.

Description by Stu/D/O Architects:

This three-story house for a family of four has a footprint of 250 square meters and a height of 11 meters. It is located on the street corner in one of the most exquisite and densely populated residential areas of Bangkok. Flanked by rows of shophouses,main living spaces are elevated to the second floor to improve the visual conditions and allow rooms for service spaces on ground. Upon arrival, one is greeted with the skylights, through which shown the rippling strips of caustic patterns resulting from the interplay between lights and water of the swimming pool above. The changing time of the day contributes to the changing color of lights, making this parking space- the arrival space, more dynamic.

Built mainly with reinforced concrete structure and a partial steel frame, the project’s exterior is comprised of natural materials such as wood louver, glass panels, and exposed concrete. The more private spaces- the bedrooms, are located on the 3rd floor which external envelope is cladded with timber slats, giving extra privacy and security. This double-skinned façade acts as a sunshade, reducing the amount of heat collected in the building. Some of the slats are open-able panels; which, when opened, create wind walls and encourage natural ventilation. When the Jolys are away, the panels can be completely shut to protect their belongings from the heat and solar damage. While serving environmental purposes, the timber slats also add a warm but modern look to the house.


Design Office: Stu/D/O Architects
Interior Architect: Attapon Wiboonyanon
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
Area: 750.0 m2
Project Year: 2014
Structural Engineer: .N.G. Engineering Ordinary Partnerships
Photographs: Krisada Boonchaleow, Courtesy of Stu/D/O Architects, Chanin Limapornvanich


 

 

Cafe “REDCUP” in Sochi, Russia | Allarts Design

Cafe “REDCUP” located in Sochi, Russia.

It was designed by  Saranin Artemy of Allarts Design in 2016.


Description by Allarts Design:

Bright interior of the new coffee REDCUP opened in Sochi (Southern Russia). On the interior worked Saranin Artemije of ALLARTSDESIGN studio (Russia, Perm).

Retro futuristic interior is stored immediately. The radial column with vertical rhythm beige pipes resemble bamboo trunks, colored furniture, the wall of the branded coffee cups and ever-changing red and white ornaments. On smiley from glasses with a smile looks Asian, her we drew in Perm – from the designer himself, we laid rectangular tiles and they had formed the image itself is supported -This message of eastern positions of menu coffee REDCUP.

The hall has stained-glass windows along the facade, through which gets a lot of natural light, and in the evening when the light is switched on, the atmosphere in the room becomes more warm and cozy.

Space coffee shop with a total area of 190 square meters consists of a variety of seating areas provided for the coffee break, or dinner in the company. The hall is fully mobile.

The original layout has not undergone changes. The radial column, non-parallel walls, all the broken geometry did not have initially. Columns and strange corners of walls – we beat beige pipes, hidden and soften the line. Around the central columns, we have placed a perimeter longsofu. Thereafter, the remaining areas have already formed. The ceiling was originally such. We changed the color, added cornices and ceiling lighting in circles.

Here you can relax, you can enjoy a taste of the rich flavor of real coffee and relax with a glass of beer crafting Urals.

Design Office       : Allarts Design
Designer               : Saranin Artemy
Location                : Sochi, Russia
Area (sq.m.)         : 190 m2
Project Year          : 2016
Photographs        : Saranin Artemy


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Queensbury Ranch | Mark J Williams Design

Queensbury Ranch located in California, Usa.

It was designed by Mark J Williams Design.

 

Design Office: Mark J Williams Design

Location: California, Usa

Photographs: Mark J Williams Design

Bush House | Archterra Architects

Bush House is located in Margaret River, Australia.

It was designed by Archterra Architects.

 

Description by Archterra Architects:

Located in an existing clearing within a section of remnant marri/ jarrah bushland this owner-built bush pavilion seeks to distill into built form, the feelings of camping under a simple sheltering tarp

Diagrammatically, the houses’ simple rectangular plan is separated east-west into sleeping and living zones and delineated by a change in floor level and a grounding rammed earth wall that continues thru the house into the outdoors.

Taking cues from the Californian cases study houses of the 40s, 50s and 60s, a 3.6m structural grid locates prefabricated steel frames that enabled the main support structure to be erected in a day and for infill timber framing to be subsequently carried out by the owner-builder within these frames under the protection of a simple single roof plane. The galvanised steel framing is expressed both internally and externally and its mottled patina continues to change as it ages.

Environmental sustainability is intrinsic to the design: passive measures such as efficient cross flow ventilation for summer cooling and calculated eaves overhangs for warming winter sun penetration are teamed with active measures such as power self sufficiency from a 3kW ground mounted solar array, a solar hot water system and a worm farm blackwater filtration system that irrigates the garden with nutrient rich water.

External materials were selected to be largely self finishing to minimise maintenance: zincalume steel, rammed earth, glass – all decking is recycled jarrah.

 

Design Office: Archterra Architects

Location: Margaret River, Australia

Photographs: Douglas Mark Black

 

Mjölk House | Studio Junction

 

Design Office: Studio Junction

Location: Toronto, Canada

 

Montauk Beach House | Space Exploration Design

Description by Space Exploration Design:

This threestory, split level house for a young family is nestled atop a densely wooded bluff in Montauk, New York, surrounded by sumac and spruce trees. Space Exploration designed an open kitchen on the top floor of the house to act as a flexible social center for the house, and to maximize the site’s dramatic views of Fort Pond and Fort Pond Bay, the nearby bodies of water that dominate the view. Floor toceiling sliding doors and a large rectangular skylight flood the space with an abundance of natural light. Countertops of marinegrade Baltic birch plywood — originally intended to be temporary — eventually won over the owners, who have decided to keep them.

The kitchen table is a repurposed marble slab, which previously topped an island (since demolished) in the owner’s home in Brooklyn. The faucet and sink are by Rohl, and the brass pulls in the kitchen are actually towel holders by the Japanese brand Futagami. The owners wanted their house to have a light, unpretentious, casual feel befitting a beach house in the historically sleepy surfing town of Montauk, where it stands. To help them achieve that end, throughout the house Space Exploration employed a material palette of light, neutral colors and pale woods, which combine to create a tranquil, airy atmosphere that showcases an eclectic collection of furniture and objects, collected by the owners during travels to Morocco, Europe and Central America. A lone primitive wooden dining chair, abandoned by the house’s previous owners, sits happily in the mix.

The lower floor houses the children’s bedroom, a home office, and a sunken “solarium,” or recreation room, that opens directly to the house’s sprawling grounds. Walnut shelving on this level is by Atlas Industries. The children’s bathroom floor was finished with salvaged antique encaustic tiles . Other design strategies included relocating and expanding windows in several rooms to better frame views and emit light. Window systems with minimal jamb detailing were selected to emphasize the connection between indoors and outdoors.Flooring throughout the top two floors (entry level and upstairs kitchen) is wideplank red oak, blanched and stained nearly white.

On the lower level, the floor is highquality plywood finished with glossy white epoxy. Gubi sconces illuminate the walls on the top two floors, and for the bathrooms, Space Exploration specified plumbing trims from the “Henry” collection, by Waterworks. In order to preserve an honest, informal feeling in the architecture, Space Exploration chose to expose and express the house’s structure wherever possible, and conceived a new wooden stair that mirrors the simple construction vernacular of the floor framing, newly visible on the entry level.

 

Design Office: Space Exploration Design

Location: New York, Usa

 

Cascina | Persico Studio

Design Office: Persico Studio

Location:Maristella, Italy

 

Casa Cor | Pedro Lázaro

Design Office: Pedro Lázaro

Location: Belo Horizonte, Brazil

Photographs: Jomar Braganca

House 02 | Daffonchio & Associates Architects

 

Description by Daffonchio & Associates Architects:

The house is set on a secluded, tranquil stand surrounded by established trees. The main house consists of 2 wings: the living wing and the bedroom wing. Both wings have long, low roofs which appear to float over and past them. These roofs are supported on external steel posts, as all of the walls stop short of the ceiling, with clerestory windows on top of all internal and external walls. The clerestory windows allow views of the trees from inside the house, and admit a soft, diffused light into the house during the day. At night, the ceilings are lit up by lights which are concealed below the clerestory windows. This creates a soft, ambient light, and enhances the floating effect of the roofs. The deep overhangs of the roofs and the generous concrete aprons around the house extend the house into the garden both spatially and visually. The deep roof overhangs also shade the glass in summer, protecting the house from solar heat gain.

Along the full length of the northern side of the living area is a 16 meter long floor to ceiling motorized frameless glass sliding door. When opened, the door disappears into cavity walls, and the living area effectively becomes an open covered patio, with 2 large cavity sliders on the south side opening onto a secluded courtyard.

The entrance door was designed by South African artist Marcus Neustetter. It comprises a sheet of laser cut steel on the outside and laser cut walnut on the inside, with clear glass in between to let light shine in during the day and out at night. The laser cut image originates from a Google Earth image showing the topography of Johannesburg and the surrounding areas.

The minimalist architecture, expansive spaces, soft natural daylight and white walls in the house serve as a backdrop for other artwork throughout the house.

The eco-pool has been designed to read as part of the garden, with gravel banks acting as the transition between the garden and the pool, and planted wetlands blending visually with the surrounding landscaping.

 

Design Office: Daffonchio & Associates Architects

Location: Hyde Park, Johannesburg, South Africa

Evans House | A4estudio

Design Office: A4estudio

Location: Mendoza, Argentina

 

Elizabeth II | Bates Masi Architects

Description by Bates Masi Architects:

Too often, architecture fixates on the visual sense, with little regard for other faculties of perception. The location of this house, in the heart of a bustling resort town, demanded special consideration of the acoustic sense. Research in architectural acoustics drove the form, materials, and detail of the house, not only shielding the property from the sound of the village, but also manipulating interior details to create a unique acoustic character for the house, one that will instill lasting memories for the family and their guests.

The house is comprised of a series of parallel walls that provide layers of privacy and insulation from the sound of the village. The walls project beyond the living spaces and ascend in height, building from a human-scale wall at the entry to a high wall along the center of the house. The walls diffract the sound waves moving past them, casting an acoustic shadow over the property to create a quiet outdoor gathering area.

The walls are built with insulated concrete forms: a wall assembly nearly twenty inches thick, comprised of a poured concrete core, continuous from footing to roof, wrapped in insulating foam, that also serves as formwork during construction. These walls provide excellent thermal insulation and an extremely low sound transmission coefficient. Due to the strength of their concrete cores, the walls act as structural beams, enabling them to span over the gathering space at the center of the house and the covered deck.

The custom stainless steel clips that attach the wide cedar board siding to the walls were designed to prolong the life of the siding. Traditional wood siding eventually fails because the natural expansion and contraction of the wood is constricted by the screws or nails that rigidly fasten it in place, slowly pulling out the fasteners or splitting the wood. The spring-like clips, however, hold the boards in tension against the house while allowing freedom for the natural movement of the wood.

Inside, variations on the clips are utilized as robe hooks, cabinet pulls, and hinges for an adjustable sound baffle in the central gathering space. The hinges hang cedar boards in front of a felt panel with spaces between them. Sound waves pass through the gaps between the boards, are trapped behind them, and absorbed by the felt. The hinges allow the spacing of the boards to be adjusted so the room can be acoustically tuned for intimate gatherings or boisterous parties. The stair is also tuned to create a subtle acoustic experience. The stair treads taper in thickness, changing the pitch of footfalls as one ascends from the woodshop in the basement, past the main floor with public spaces, guest room, and master bedroom, and up to the childrens’ rooms on the upper floor.

The research of sound and how it affects our perception of space informed the details, materials, and form of the project. This approach to the design led to a richer and more meaningful home for the family.

Design Office: Bates Masi Architects

Location: Amagansett, New York, Usa

House in Ballarat | Moloney Architects

Description by Moloney Architects:

This project is an extension and restoration of a large historic home in central Ballarat (Victoria Australia). The new works extend to from the south side of the existing house, and create a glass connection to the backyard. The roof of the extension is pitched up to the north – with clerestory windows filling the new living spaces with natural light. The different structures are connected via a glazed linkway that clearly differentiates the architectural eras, and allows the old and new designs to sit comfortably side by side.

Design Office: Moloney Architects

Location: Ballarat, Australia

Photographs: Shannon McGrath

The Dangle-Byrd House | Koko Architecture + Design

Description by Koko Architecture + Design:

The Dangle-Byrd project was an opportunity to explore the challenge of maintaining the spirit of craftsmanship within a modern domestic landscape. Set on a wooded five-acre site in rural Pennsylvania, the house utilizes a material consciousness to engage the neighboring handcrafted Amish farm buildings.

The house consists of three interlocking volumes. While each volume is very simple in its form, the exchange between them allows for a wide variety of spatial experiences. The first impression one has is that the house is two “shadow-boxes” connected by a “bird cage”. However, as you enter the house the perceptions change. From the interior, the cage is no longer a figure, but rather a looking glass to the outside. The single storied master suite becomes an intimate walnut valise, retreating from the exposed glass living room. A dramatic perforated steel bridge passing through a two-storied screened porch reaches the guest suite. The northern end of the house has a private balcony looking down to the lap pool set into the woods.

The elegant engineering of farming equipment and local Pennsylvania trussed bridges inspired the unusual structure of the house. The resulting form is a steel “exo-skeleton” with a wood and glass box suspended within the exposed frame. The structure is not just visual, but literally wraps around the inner volume as if it were a “ship in a bottle”. The glass living room walls and roof structure is suspended off of the cage by 6 strategic supports.

Severe in form, the materiality of the house combined with a sustainable approach allows it to become part of the surrounding landscape. Passive solar heating and radiant floors enable the “bird cage” to respond to Pennsylvania Winters. A massive “hand set” stone chimney anchors the house. The luminous floating glass walls of the living room contradict this permanence. The blackened cedar boxes combine the architects’ Japanese background with the simplicity of the Pennsylvania farm buildings The honest steel structure and rough cedar boxes reinforce the importance of “making” rather than “concealing.

 

Design Office: Koko Architecture + Design

Location: Downingtown, Pennsylvania, USA

Photographs: Nikolas Koenig, Patrick Casey

Αpartment in Kiev | ArchObraz architectural studio

Description by ArchObraz architectural studio:

The apartment design is driven by transformation of the roof load-bearing elements into decorative objects. Their clear strong lines were used to guide zoning of the interior. Built-in soft lighting smoothens the contrast between the uncovered functional construction and cosiness of hearth. Fireplace, paintings on the walls and wide terrace with city view complete home atmosphere.

Design Office: ArchObraz architectural studio

Location:Kiev, Ukraine

Photographs: Andrey Avdeenko

Eppich house Renovation | Battersby Howat Architects

 

Design Office: Battersby Howat Architects

Location: West Vancouver, Canada

Photographs: Sama Jim Canzian

The Apartment – Graanmarkt 13 | Vincent Van Duysen Architects

Description by Vincent Van Duysen Architects:

The house is crucial in the entire story. It’s a private House where – on the top floor – a family lives, but at the same time it has several public functions that we wanted to bring together in the same floor. We didn’t go for spectacular architecture, on the contrary.”

THE APARTMENT
Graanmarkt 13 is created as a welcoming and warm home, where everyone should feel at ease, with a restaurant, a shop, a gallery space and an apartment all under one roof. The remarkable concept occupies an entire townhouse in the center of Antwerp, with the traditional building being reworked by Vincent Van Duysen, one of Belgian’s best architects. In the past years owners Tim Van Geloven and Ilse Cornelissens turned Graanmarkt 13 into a household name, but wisely kept one secret to themselves. The initial idea was also to include a bed & breakfast on the top floors. But plans changed when Tim & Ilse saw the plans developing and decided to turn all available space into one luxurious apartment. Described as ’their best kept secret’, the apartment is now available for rent.

STYLISH HOME AWAY FROM HOME
When entering the duplex apartment, you feel at home, a stylish home that is. Apart from the protected historic facade, Van Duysen’s signature style of brutalism, softened by natural materials, runs like a red thread throughout the building. Tim & Ilse used two floors as their private quarters and although they are gone, you can sense their presence in the smallest details. „We just packed our clothes and left”, Ilse argues. When she and Tim started their project, they both wanted to be on top of it, literally. But the project has grown, so have their children and now the family is moving into a family home with a garden. Tim adds: „I’m going to miss the terrace and the panoramic view on the city. And although you’re at the heart of the city, it’s very calm, green and quiet out here.” Graanmarkt 13 is located in the middle of the city, on a picturesque square where trees reveal the passing of the seasons. At the back of a building there’s an old ginkgo tree overlooking the rooftop garden and beehives, providing herbs and honey that chef Seppe Nobels uses in his dishes in the restaurant, which is located in the cellar.

Design Office: Vincent Van Duysen Architects

Location: Antwerp, Belgium

Photographs: Frederik Vercruysse

Noe Residence | Studio Vara

Description by Studio Vara:

A research scientist with an eye for detail approached Studio VARA with a modest vision and a couple of basic practical needs: First, transform a 1908 Noe Valley cottage– with a history of subpar alterations – into a cohesive modern dwelling. Second, provide an enclosed garage in a neighborhood with tough parking. The result is a quiet house of 3500 sq. ft. with two distinct faces; one that provides privacy from urban street traffic, and another that opens up to expansive Bay views.

Traces of the original cottage are preserved in the massing and circulation of the final building. The grand stair marks the separation between public spaces to the south and private spaces to the north. The new garage is incorporated into the “public” massing, with guest suites both above and below. To the north, the open living area at the heart of the home expands past the folding window wall to the east-facing deck beyond, where one can bask in the panoramic views of the City and East Bay, or contemplate the juxtaposition of urban and natural in the garden below. Above this main space is the master suite, which takes advantage of even grander views through both framed openings and a lofty private deck.

From inside to outside, the architectural/engineering team provided full-services every step of the way, from initial concepts to final completion in 2013: City planning, building permits, and all phases of design and construction oversight, including architecture, interiors, furnishings, landscape, and lighting. The team consistently worked toward creating a calm and peaceful retreat, with a balance of restraint and supple details sure to be appreciated by a client with a discerning eye. The project’s success lies in the judicious use of these carefully executed “moments” –natural wood screening at the master bedroom window which reinterprets an existing invasive tree; a wall of custom cabinetry that unifies the kitchen and living room, clad in veneer hand-picked by the client; the dance of metal and glass on the main stair guardrail; the subtle palette of “warm” mixed with “cool” that recurs in both tone and materials: wood juxtaposed with glass, metal against stone.

Design Office: Studio Vara

Location: San Francisco, California, Usa

Photographs: Bruce Damonte

Apartment in Slovakia | Rules Architects

Description by Rules Architects:

Large size apartment in a residential complex Condominium in Bojnice, Slovakia was created by a combination of two “smaller” apartments with average footprint about 100 m². We have created fresh modern interior, where we have used high quality materials corresponding to the lucrative estate. The original layout was useless so we took away all partitions walls and distributions including underfloor heating. The result is worth it, new apartment has a logical zoning, proportional space, large living room and terrace with a views on Bojnice.

Design Office: Rules Architects

Location: Bojnice, Slovakia