Peninsula Residence | SJB Interiors

The liveable, tactile and comforting Peninsula Residence is located in Melbourne, Australia.

It was designed by SJB Interiors.

Description by SJB Interiors:

Designed to be tough… A bold reimagining honouring the history and integrity of the original home yet placing it firmly within contemporary 21st century design. A large glass pavilion houses the stunning new Master suite and multiple floor levels address the natural fall of the landscape. Tough materials like cedar, steel, glass, natural stone and concrete are featured in unrestrained sophistication.

Colour blazes forth unapologetically; glossy red echoes brazenly from kitchen to powderoom and the enclosed internal stairwell which leads to the roof terrace. Burnt oranges, vivid greens and moody blues elevate quiet spaces and pair perfectly alongside contemporary furnishings.

The result is a space that is certainly bold and unrestrained – yet more importantly it’s liveable, tactile and comforting.


Design Office: SJB Interiors

Location: Melbourne, Australia

Photographs: Nicole England


 

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House in Mernda | Carlisle Homes

This contemporary house is located in Melbourne, Australia.

It was designed by Carlisle Homes.

 


Design Office: Carlisle Homes

Location: Melbourne, Australia


 

Eltham Residence | Patrick Meneguzzi Interiors

This farm house is located in Eltham, Victoria, Australia.

It was designed by Patrick Meneguzzi Interiors.

 


Design Office: Patrick Meneguzzi Interiors

Location: Eltham, Victoria, Australia

Photographs: Patrick Meneguzzi Interiors


 

House in Melbourne | Alexandra Buchanan Architecture

The contemporary home is located  in Melbourne, Australia.

It was designed by Alexandra Buchanan Architecture.

Description by Alexandra Buchanan Architecture:

Covered in trees with restricted access and falling steeply to the river, the site posed a number of design challenges, including Environmental and Bushfire Overlays (BAL29). The form and materiality of the house were guided by the views, orientation, topography and context.

The twin butterfly roofs lift the eaves to catch daylight from every direction and enhance the sense of space and connection to outdoors. The house’s dual ‘wings’ slide with the landscape to create privacy for neighbouring properties while maximising views, daylight and access to external entertaining spaces. A glazed circulation slot creates a dramatic but efficient connection between the two forms.

The generous roof terrace with external fireplace and arbour allow for contemporary outdoor entertaining as the natural terrain of the site falls below, relatively untouched.


Design Office: Alexandra Buchanan Architecture
Collaborators: Hive Engineering, Nathan Burckett Landscape Design
Location: North Warrandyte, Victoria, Australia
Area: 249,0 m2
Construction team: Eco Edge Homes
Photographs: Marvelle Photography


 

Coolum Bays Beach House | Aboda Design Group

The Coolum Bays Beach House is located in Queensland, Australia.

It was designed by Aboda Design Group.

Description by Adoda Design Group:

As former owner of the adjoining property, the client’s imperative was to accommodate a family with the three children nearing adulthood and take advantage of the amazing potential for white water views from the Coolum Bays all the way to Noosa Heads. The challenge was to accommodate a steep driveway from Fauna Terrace, which tucked under the home to accommodate three cars (without requiring excavation of rock), half-storey accommodation above all within the local planning envelope.

Once the site constraints were fully understood, the building form was developed to accommodate the four en suited bedrooms, two living areas plus media room, kitchen, dining, laundry, home office, two powder rooms, workshop, pool and rainwater tank.

From the outset, the client (also the builder) confirmed the preferred floor construction was suspended concrete and the planning was then explored to exploit the best of this material, including large spans and cantilevers. Similarly, the desire to project the roof over the pool and deck could only be realised in structural steel – achieving a dramatic plane which ‘letterboxes’ the ocean vistas through a horizontal aperture.

The client also requested a durable, low maintenance home that would handle the extreme weather events that can occur in this location. As a result of its projection from the hillside, the wind and rain can be torrential, however through clever planning the family room was located at the south east end of the building, providing a buffer, creating comfortable, protected outdoor space on the adjacent deck.

As an informal family, the intent was to have a home that would ensure that everyone remained connected to one another, whilst also achieving distinct public and private spaces. Predominantly, this was achieved by stepping the building down the site, so that spaces cascade as half levels. The only full flight is to the private master bedroom suite located on the upper floor.

Again through clever planning and the integration of operable and fixed sun control devices (batten screens, vertical blades, natural vegetation), the home enjoys wonderful privacy from the street and neighbours, all without requiring boundary fencing.

Living spaces are arranged along this axis, all with access to northern light. A consequence of the steepness of the site was that the only compliant driveway location would be along the northern boundary, with car parking tucked beneath the house to maximise the northern exposure. Living spaces are arranged around the pool, which brings the benefits of cooling breezes and dappled light.

All three en suites are arranged to the west of the house, to act as a thermal buffer between the hot afternoon sun and the main living and bedroom spaces. Windows are kept to a minimum on this elevation and in the case of the master suite, are covered with a feature sun control batten screen over the fully operable louvres.

On the southern elevation, glazing is again used sparingly to achieve vistas of trees and the bays, and draw cool breezes through the house.

On the northern elevation, shading devices range from operable vertical blades to the living; timber batten screens to the study and master bedroom; and a large, projecting cantilevered roof over the pool and deck.

Glazing is generally highly operable stacking sliding doors or louvres and incorporate low-e glass. Fixed glass is used in locations heavily exposed to gales.

The materials sourced were a combination of concrete and steel for structural strength and durability, both readily available and recyclable, and locally sourced pine framing generally, with hardwood used for exposed timber elements. Wall finishes were Rockcote polymer render or James Hardie lightweight fibre cement cladding. Glazing and the feature entry awning are lightweight aluminium. Western red cedar was selected for the battens due to its hardiness.

The home is defined by clearly articulated shapes, the rectangular white master en suite box, flanked by the raking off form concrete ground floor en suites, in a symmetrical composition, capped by the feature polycarbonate awning. Contrast is achieved between the lightness of the upper elements and frameless glass entry door, counterpointed by the heaviness and solidity of the concrete boxes, feature tiled external walls and landscape gabions.

To the northern elevation, the composition is more dynamic, projecting from the hillside out towards the bays, the cantilever achieved with a combination of up and down-turned rendered concrete beams and concealed steel members hidden in the deck and roofs.

The home connects to Fauna Terrace, the bays and to Noosa Heads. At the street end, a steep slope has been tamed with the introduction of large format off form concrete ‘steppers’ and the conscious decision not to fence the site. Separation, as is the case internally, is achieved via levels rather than physical barriers. At the eastern end, the projection of the living spaces, particularly the family room with picture window focuses the connection to Point Perry and First Bay. From the bench seating, views are captured across the deck and pool all the way up the coast to Sunshine Beach.

The aesthetic appeal, whist unconventional, has garnered admirers both locally, who believe it captures a refined and elegant beach lifestyle without being derivative of past methods of creating the typical ‘beach house’, and internationally, demonstrated by the overwhelming request to feature the house in magazines, books and online.

All spaces except the upper floor master suite, which is a full storey above the ground floor to achieve the best of the views, are connected by half-levels, to maintain a connectivity through the house. Furnishings are a combination of contemporary freestanding pieces (eg. living room suite) and built in elements (external bench seat, internal family banquettes, master bedroom day bed, all designed in house). Views of the bays are achieved from the front entry right through the house and all but one bedroom enjoy water views. Wherever possible, spaces remain open plan (master en suite) to maximise the openness and sense of space. The tones and textures of the materials (timber, stone, carpet, tile) are accentuated over ‘feature’ colours, with highlights added in the soft furnishings and fabrics. The form of the interior cabinetry reflects in Calacutta marble and timber the white box featured on the street elevation (in white render and western red cedar).

The two en suites contained within the off form concrete continue the same rugged materiality internally, softened with crisp fittings, mirror and floor tile. These spaces are naturally illuminated with a feature skylight slicing through the concrete.

Detailing took into consideration the often formidable driving wind and rain to provide weather protection (particularly to the south east) to exclude draft and water.

Coolum Bays Beach House‘ was also awarded as a winner in numerous residential categories at both regional and state level at the BDAQ awards in 2013 and won the overall best residential design in Queensland.


Design Office: Aboda Design Group

Location: Coolum Beach, Queensland, Australia

Constractor: Fauna Homes

Photographs: Paul Smith Images

 

Thirroul House | Jason Miles

The Thirroul House, a 1980s cottage with open living and entertaining space, is located in Thirroul, Australia.

It was builded by Jason Miles.

Description by Jason Miles:

This 1980s cottage needed a significant rear addition to create more open living and entertaining space and give flowing access to the beautiful gardens. Upon a heated polished slab we built lightweight framing to support high ceilings and wide-span openings. The internal walls feature unique curves that seamlessly become the ceiling while streamlined kitchen joinery and extensive light and circulation deliver a true inside-out lifestyle. Again, the key to this job was shared enjoyment of creativity and constant communication.


Build Office: Jason Miles

Location: Thirroul, Australia

Photographs: Courtesy of Jason Miles


Planchonella House | Jesse Bennett Architect

The Planchonella House, a 280,0 m2  home with joyful spaces, is located in Queensland, Australia.

It was designed by Jesse Bennett Architect in 2014.

Description by Jesse Bennett Architect:

Planchonella House was designed with a simple idea in mind- to create a series of joyful spaces to inspire and enrich daily life. Set in tropical north Queensland, the house embraces the heritage rainforest surrounds and utilises experimental passive design methods. The simplistic approach and use of Lo-Fi technologies results in a raw and honest dwelling.

Contours of the site ridgeline have formed basis for the playful lines utilised in concrete profiles. As not to protrude out with the ridge, the profile is mirrored and cuts back in to the ridge. Visual amenity from surrounding lower areas has been maintained with this design in that rather than creating a dominant form on the landscape, it tucks back in at the critical highest most revealing point. The wings created each side of the ridge float into the surrounding rainforest and become part of the tree canopy.

The large flat roof with generous overhang acts as a rainforest canopy above, minimal walls and columns in between allow for un-obstructed views and moments to be shared with the landscape. This omission of boundaries between inside and outside gives an openness and quality of space that is surreal, living completely within and engulfed by a beautiful landscape. The resolution of plan follows a purely functional approach to use of space, privacy, visual connection and passive design principles.

The plan wraps around the courtyard space, which is considered the second hearth (after the kitchen) or perhaps lungs to the entire dwelling. The courtyard contributes much to the house and its occupants, it is an oasis that provides sun, light, ventilation, happiness, activity, visual stimulation, and entertainment. It also provides connection to the surrounding rainforest, connection from one part of the house to another, and acts as the focal node to the promenade experience of moving through the house.


Design Office: Jesse Bennett Architect
Location: Queensland, Australia
Interior Designer: Anne-Marie Campagnolo
Area: 280.0 m2
Project Year: 2014
Photographs: Sean Fennessy


Double Bay House | Arent & Pyke

Double Bay House located in Sydney, Australia.

It was designed by  Arent & Pyke.

Descriprion by Arent & Pyke:

Bringing the personality and warmth of a young family into the cool interior of this bay-side house, the design posits communication and flow as essential to living. As such, the grand staircase was remade as a visually dynamic, perpetually unfurling line traversing the three floors.
Recomposing the home to both a human scale and aesthetic, the design called for a complete rethink of the living spaces. From the entry hall to the suite of rooms on the third floor, nuance and detail of design were layered into a new palette comprising timber flooring, generous rugs and generously proportioned furnishings in natural leather and linen.


Design Office: Arent & Pyke
Location: Sydney, Australia
Photographs: Felix Forest
Awards:
– IDEA Interior Design Excellence Awards
   Shortlist – Residential Interior Design

– Belle Coco Republic Interior Design Awards 2016
   WINNER – People’s Choice Awards for Best Residential Interior


 

MCF Residence | Mim Design

MCF Residence located in Australia.

It was designed by Mim Design.


Design Office: Mim Design

Location: Australia


 

Fitzroy Loft | Architects EAT

Fitzroy Loft  located in Melbourne, Australia.

It was designed by Architects EAT.

Description by Architects EAT:

This project is a conversion of a gritty 250m2 brick warehouse in the old industrial area of Fitroy into a family home. The former industrial building is a mixture of intimately scaled family spaces and vast entertaining voids. Two full height voids act as the lungs of the design bringing both light and sky views deep into the internal space. The private areas such as the study and bedroom are accommodated on the first floor by volumes of a more intimate scale.
The Fitzroy Loft was the Winner of 2016 Australian Interior Design Award for Residential Design.


Design Office: Architects EAT
Location
: Melbourne, Australia
Area: 250.0 m2
Completed Year: 2015
Photographs: Derek Swalwell


 

Alex Hotel | Space Agency + Arent & Pyke

Alex Hotel is located in Australia.

It was designed by Space Agency +  Arent & Pyke.

 

Description by Arent & Pyke:

Alex Hotel responds to the overarching concept of the ‘Hotel as Home’. Together with the client, four key concepts were established for the interior design; ‘the personal’, ‘the escape’, ‘the craft’ and ‘the legacy’, to nurture a sense of intimacy, connectedness and domesticity. With the client, there was always a discussion about ‘Alex’ being someone familliar to us all; an uncle whose home you love to visit, a treasured old friend with a house full of wonderment. The interior design, furnishing and styling imagines the richness, the personality, a sense of frivolity and the layering of a story.

Design Office  : Space Agency,  Arent & Pyke
Location           : Australia
Photographs   : Anson Smart

Bush House | Archterra Architects

Bush House is located in Margaret River, Australia.

It was designed by Archterra Architects.

 

Description by Archterra Architects:

Located in an existing clearing within a section of remnant marri/ jarrah bushland this owner-built bush pavilion seeks to distill into built form, the feelings of camping under a simple sheltering tarp

Diagrammatically, the houses’ simple rectangular plan is separated east-west into sleeping and living zones and delineated by a change in floor level and a grounding rammed earth wall that continues thru the house into the outdoors.

Taking cues from the Californian cases study houses of the 40s, 50s and 60s, a 3.6m structural grid locates prefabricated steel frames that enabled the main support structure to be erected in a day and for infill timber framing to be subsequently carried out by the owner-builder within these frames under the protection of a simple single roof plane. The galvanised steel framing is expressed both internally and externally and its mottled patina continues to change as it ages.

Environmental sustainability is intrinsic to the design: passive measures such as efficient cross flow ventilation for summer cooling and calculated eaves overhangs for warming winter sun penetration are teamed with active measures such as power self sufficiency from a 3kW ground mounted solar array, a solar hot water system and a worm farm blackwater filtration system that irrigates the garden with nutrient rich water.

External materials were selected to be largely self finishing to minimise maintenance: zincalume steel, rammed earth, glass – all decking is recycled jarrah.

 

Design Office: Archterra Architects

Location: Margaret River, Australia

Photographs: Douglas Mark Black

 

Kate’s House | Bower Architecture

Description by Bower Architecture:

Kate’s House is a single storey extension and renovation to a 1960’s house, entered through a side courtyard sanctuary which separates the retained part of the existing dwelling and the new addition. Bagged brick walls and sculptural use of timber typify the use of raw yet restrained materials that combine with the fine grain offered by brass and steel detailing. Living and private zones are defined by a series of high gallery spaces which naturally light and ventilate the house, while vividly tiled bathrooms are treated as discovered gems. The house maintains a continuous connection to landscape and garden as it terraces down the site to a lower family level, leading to the dramatic pool area beyond.

Video:

Design Office: Bower Architecture

Location: Australia

Photographs: Shannon McGrath

Courtyard House | Robson Rak Architects

Description byRobson Rak Architects:

Behind an unassuming façade, the Courtyard house opens up to reveal a pared back design response, mixed with luxurious materials, and practical detailing. This existing building has been altered and extended, with the interior design responding to our client’s love of Japanese architecture and rituals.

The site is 7.5m by 46m with minimal street presence wedged amongst two large double storey residences. Our design response was to create two large courtyard spaces that brought light and greenery into all living areas, and created a much larger interior space that continues to surprise as one moves through the house. The brief called for a complete modernisation and re-fit of an 80’s home. The client’s wish was for a restrained material palette and a strong connection with nature.

Modern amenities such as a lift, cellar, and butlers pantry were added to the house along with furniture and fittings that would bring the building up to the desired current standards. Linearity is achieved by methods such as built in seating and joinery, created to avoid interrupting this flow with superfluous furniture. Every room has a strong connection with nature; even the cellar we created with leather banquette seating has a low window looking out to the courtyard whilst also limiting sun exposure to the wine. As an integral aspect of our design response, we collaborated closely with a landscaper (Ed Purcey) on the external spaces to create the desired outcome of reflection and relaxation. The house opens to the outside and embraces the elements, resulting in the feel of a much larger space.

The interior design contains many hidden and built in elements that allow the rituals of life to be carried out with ease and no fuss. For example, at the entrance, a long joinery unit cantilevers into a bench that functions as a seat. When one enters the house, they can sit on this bench seat, remove their shoes, and place them in the drawers in the joinery unit, like a contemporary getabako shelf. The remarkable aspect of this building is that one can exist within it and feel quite removed from the noise and stress of day to day life that is situated on their doorstep. It is a building to experience life, and take refuge from life. The constant connection to nature is prevalent, even in spaces one would least expect it from. For example, one can sit comfortably in a dimly lit cellar and still have a view and relationship to the courtyard.

Design Office: Robson Rak Architects

Location: Melbourne, Australia

Photographs: Shannon McGrath

Restaurant ACME | Luchetti Krelle

Description by Luchetti Krelle:

ACME makes the most of the building’s existing features and heritage. The brief, a refined yet casual space where the food is the hero.
A pared back and considered design, the restaurant is split into 3 distinct spaces over 2 levels. The front bar is a casual dining experience, high top tables and window seating open to the streetscape and passers-by. The surrounding walls have been left untreated, showing glimpses of exposed plaster and stripped paint. Within the formal dining space, dark timber banquette seating sits amongst fresh painted walls complimenting the rough plaster of the front bar and an open kitchen maintains the casual attitude of the restaurant.
Downstairs the private dining room is a raw and intimate retreat. A private cellar that offers diners an exclusive space with existing walls exposed and the sandstone fireplace left intact. An island bench offers an informal meeting space for private diners to gather before their meal, guests are then ushered towards the custom-made extendable table, striking in its design, the table offers collapsible ends that raise and lower dependent upon group size.

Design Office: Luchetti Krelle

Location:Rushcutters Bay, Australia

Photographs: Michael Wee

The Beach Box | Weststyle Design & Development

 

Design Office: Weststyle Design & Development

Location: Australia

 

Harbour Front Residence | Hess Hoen

Design Office: Hess Hoen

Location: New South Wales, Australia

Orama Residence | Smart Design Studio

Description by Smart Design Studio:

The transformation of ‘Orama’, a gracious Victorian villa in Sydney’s Woollahra was a welcome opportunity to work once again with the family for whom Smart Design Studio renovated ‘Mandolong House’ on the lower north shore. Our brief was to enhance and expand the historic house to suit the changed needs of the family.
Built in two stages, the project addressed the original villa as a distinct entity, housing bedrooms, bathrooms, formal living and study spaces. Beautifully-crafted elements of the historic house, such as fireplaces and early paint schemes, were retained. Other parts of the villa were updated with sensitively-chosen fittings and fixtures to bring out the best of the old building. The design approach was to make the old house feel trim, white, and tailored. By contrast, the new addition was designed to be minimal in form and detail, with textured raw concrete extending from the walls out into the garden, punctuated by swathes of water (the pool), vegetation, lawn, and pebbles.
A striking double-height living room forms the nucleus of the extension. Six-metre tall windows on the northern side flood the room with light, overcoming the limitations of the south-facing site. We were fortunate in that the owners have an incredible art collection. The bare concrete walls, and gracious rooms of the old house provide a dramatic setting for this. The space of the living room flows into a well-appointed stainless steel kitchen, and into the garden and swimming pool beyond. Upstairs, a guest bedroom and chic bathroom occupy the glassy link between the old and new parts of the house.
The new wing has been designed and built with the same intricacy, attention to detail, and superb craftsmanship as the original villa, applied to modern methods of construction. The materials palette of concrete, glass, dark steel, and zinc beautifully complements the chic black-and-white scheme applied to the historic house.
Environmentally sensitive elements were stitched into the old and new parts of the house, including hydronic floor heating and cooling, natural cross ventilation and an avoidance of air-conditioning, exploitation of good solar orientation, thermally massive construction, and heat-exchange technology.
Separated by a century and a half, the two parts of ‘Orama’ stand as beautiful expositions of the best construction standards of their day.

Design Office: Smart Design Studio

Location: Woollahra, Australia

 

Merricks House | Robson Rak Architects

Design Office: Robson Rak Architects

Location: Victoria, Australia

 

Balmoral House | CO-AP

 

Design Office: CO-AP

Location: Sydney, Australia

Photographs: Ross Honeysett