Coolum Bays Beach House | Aboda Design Group

The Coolum Bays Beach House is located in Queensland, Australia.

It was designed by Aboda Design Group.

Description by Adoda Design Group:

As former owner of the adjoining property, the client’s imperative was to accommodate a family with the three children nearing adulthood and take advantage of the amazing potential for white water views from the Coolum Bays all the way to Noosa Heads. The challenge was to accommodate a steep driveway from Fauna Terrace, which tucked under the home to accommodate three cars (without requiring excavation of rock), half-storey accommodation above all within the local planning envelope.

Once the site constraints were fully understood, the building form was developed to accommodate the four en suited bedrooms, two living areas plus media room, kitchen, dining, laundry, home office, two powder rooms, workshop, pool and rainwater tank.

From the outset, the client (also the builder) confirmed the preferred floor construction was suspended concrete and the planning was then explored to exploit the best of this material, including large spans and cantilevers. Similarly, the desire to project the roof over the pool and deck could only be realised in structural steel – achieving a dramatic plane which ‘letterboxes’ the ocean vistas through a horizontal aperture.

The client also requested a durable, low maintenance home that would handle the extreme weather events that can occur in this location. As a result of its projection from the hillside, the wind and rain can be torrential, however through clever planning the family room was located at the south east end of the building, providing a buffer, creating comfortable, protected outdoor space on the adjacent deck.

As an informal family, the intent was to have a home that would ensure that everyone remained connected to one another, whilst also achieving distinct public and private spaces. Predominantly, this was achieved by stepping the building down the site, so that spaces cascade as half levels. The only full flight is to the private master bedroom suite located on the upper floor.

Again through clever planning and the integration of operable and fixed sun control devices (batten screens, vertical blades, natural vegetation), the home enjoys wonderful privacy from the street and neighbours, all without requiring boundary fencing.

Living spaces are arranged along this axis, all with access to northern light. A consequence of the steepness of the site was that the only compliant driveway location would be along the northern boundary, with car parking tucked beneath the house to maximise the northern exposure. Living spaces are arranged around the pool, which brings the benefits of cooling breezes and dappled light.

All three en suites are arranged to the west of the house, to act as a thermal buffer between the hot afternoon sun and the main living and bedroom spaces. Windows are kept to a minimum on this elevation and in the case of the master suite, are covered with a feature sun control batten screen over the fully operable louvres.

On the southern elevation, glazing is again used sparingly to achieve vistas of trees and the bays, and draw cool breezes through the house.

On the northern elevation, shading devices range from operable vertical blades to the living; timber batten screens to the study and master bedroom; and a large, projecting cantilevered roof over the pool and deck.

Glazing is generally highly operable stacking sliding doors or louvres and incorporate low-e glass. Fixed glass is used in locations heavily exposed to gales.

The materials sourced were a combination of concrete and steel for structural strength and durability, both readily available and recyclable, and locally sourced pine framing generally, with hardwood used for exposed timber elements. Wall finishes were Rockcote polymer render or James Hardie lightweight fibre cement cladding. Glazing and the feature entry awning are lightweight aluminium. Western red cedar was selected for the battens due to its hardiness.

The home is defined by clearly articulated shapes, the rectangular white master en suite box, flanked by the raking off form concrete ground floor en suites, in a symmetrical composition, capped by the feature polycarbonate awning. Contrast is achieved between the lightness of the upper elements and frameless glass entry door, counterpointed by the heaviness and solidity of the concrete boxes, feature tiled external walls and landscape gabions.

To the northern elevation, the composition is more dynamic, projecting from the hillside out towards the bays, the cantilever achieved with a combination of up and down-turned rendered concrete beams and concealed steel members hidden in the deck and roofs.

The home connects to Fauna Terrace, the bays and to Noosa Heads. At the street end, a steep slope has been tamed with the introduction of large format off form concrete ‘steppers’ and the conscious decision not to fence the site. Separation, as is the case internally, is achieved via levels rather than physical barriers. At the eastern end, the projection of the living spaces, particularly the family room with picture window focuses the connection to Point Perry and First Bay. From the bench seating, views are captured across the deck and pool all the way up the coast to Sunshine Beach.

The aesthetic appeal, whist unconventional, has garnered admirers both locally, who believe it captures a refined and elegant beach lifestyle without being derivative of past methods of creating the typical ‘beach house’, and internationally, demonstrated by the overwhelming request to feature the house in magazines, books and online.

All spaces except the upper floor master suite, which is a full storey above the ground floor to achieve the best of the views, are connected by half-levels, to maintain a connectivity through the house. Furnishings are a combination of contemporary freestanding pieces (eg. living room suite) and built in elements (external bench seat, internal family banquettes, master bedroom day bed, all designed in house). Views of the bays are achieved from the front entry right through the house and all but one bedroom enjoy water views. Wherever possible, spaces remain open plan (master en suite) to maximise the openness and sense of space. The tones and textures of the materials (timber, stone, carpet, tile) are accentuated over ‘feature’ colours, with highlights added in the soft furnishings and fabrics. The form of the interior cabinetry reflects in Calacutta marble and timber the white box featured on the street elevation (in white render and western red cedar).

The two en suites contained within the off form concrete continue the same rugged materiality internally, softened with crisp fittings, mirror and floor tile. These spaces are naturally illuminated with a feature skylight slicing through the concrete.

Detailing took into consideration the often formidable driving wind and rain to provide weather protection (particularly to the south east) to exclude draft and water.

Coolum Bays Beach House‘ was also awarded as a winner in numerous residential categories at both regional and state level at the BDAQ awards in 2013 and won the overall best residential design in Queensland.


Design Office: Aboda Design Group

Location: Coolum Beach, Queensland, Australia

Constractor: Fauna Homes

Photographs: Paul Smith Images

 

Modern Residence | DIJ Group

This luxurius home is located in Beverly Hills, California, Usa.

It was designed by DIJ Group.

Description by DIJ Group:

Single level built in 2016 with six bedrooms and eight bathrooms on a 33, 579 square foot lot in the prime lower Trousdale Estates section of Beverly Hills. Epic scale with walls of glass that disappear and blur the line between indoors/outdoors. A Fifty foot Zero edge infinity pool and a massive outdoor spa hug both ends of the living room. Designed for large scale entertaining; the vast living room offers exceptionally high ceilings and converts into a luxurious Screening Room as well. A state of the art Bulthaup main Kitchen is backed by a full catering kitchen. Formal Dining Room with a custom fifteen foot fireplace. Lucite temperature controlled double sided wine cellar. Master Suite with views of Beverly Hills, and closets that rival the finest stores on Rodeo Drive. Master Bath clad in book matched calacutta slab marble. Four additional “cabana rooms” each with walls of glass opening to the lush grounds and pool beyond. Attached staff quarters. Private behind discrete gates with a large motor court with ample off street parking. A Radiant Modern Estate in the finest location.


Design Office: DIJ Group
Location: Beverly Hills, California, Usa
Project Year: 2016
Constructor: Boswell Construction
Photographs
: DIJ Group, Boswell Construction


Naman Villa | MIA Design Studio

Naman Villa, the elegant and luxury Villa A of  Naman Residence project,  is located in Da Nang, Da Nang, Vietnam.

It was designed by MIA Design Studio.

Description by MIA Design Studio:

Naman Residence project locates on the famous Non Nuoc Beach in Danang Vietnam. The Project contains 40 Villas which is categorized into for type of A, B, C, D. We would like to introduce the architecture and interior of Naman Residence – Villa A

This is a very high quality project which inspires us a lot, require the most elegant and luxury design can adapt high standard of living but still remains the feeling of the beach. The idea is mainly focus on how to maximize privacy for every family but still create vast of pleasure spaces with nature integrating the sea.

To maximize the project’s efficiency, the master-plan is well organized but the way is too narrow with high density. Within this condition, our team’s goal is to make a creative and effective design to not only satisfied maximum privacy but also create extra benefits from natural voids and gardens.

Each villa has multi-dimensional landscape with overflow pools and tropical gardens. For every villa, our design also takes advantage of space using by lifting-twisting the upper block for bedrooms with privacy and open views. The lower block with living-dining-kitchen-bedroom has the direct connection to the pool and landscape. Moreover, we put waterscape into the rooftop of the lower block in order to cool down the whole building and improve the rooftop landscape aesthetically.

Density is now not a big problem, every villa has its own garden filled up with skylights and surrounding green environment. Our design philosophy is how to inside-out the initial using space, outside-in the natural gardens enhancing the luxury-home feeling.

The materials used in constructing the house are local materials to reduce the transporting fee and save the budget of Naman Villa. The design of the house is simple and sleek, so the cost for construction is not so high. The house is constructing with Hurricane protected structure but still remain natural ventilation.


Design Office: MIA Design Studio
Architect in Charge: Nguyen Hoang Manh
Interior Design: Steven Baeteman, Truong Trong Dat
Location: Da Nang, Da Nang, Vietnam
Project Year: 2015
Photographs: Hiroyuki Oki


 

Stone House | Slee & Co. Architects

The Stone House, a home for a young family, is located in Pretoria, South Africa.

It was designed by Slee & Co. Architects.

Description by Slee & Co. Architects:

We were commissioned to design a home for a young family with two adventurous boys. The clients bought a hectare stand in a rural estate with a ‘koppie’ (a small hill rising up from the African veld) and a magnificent view over the landscape to the east of Pretoria. They wanted a home where all of this could become part of their lives. The design consists of a series of over scaled, red, “ysterklip” walls reminiscent of the dry-packed kraal walls in and around Pretoria. These stone walls, housing all the services, were staggered and positioned in such a way to create sheltered spaces between them; privacy from the neighbors on the sides and their main function to concentrate and frame the important east and the west views. All the stone were collected from the site. Carefully placed roof lights allows north light to wash into the house against the stonewalls, compensating for the east/west orientation of the site. To the west the home opens up to the koppie where the kids have their tree house and secret forest hides. To the east the house concentrates on the magnificent views down the axis of the red stonewalls. The veldt was re-established and allowed to grow back, the kitchen garden and children play lawn to the back of the home and the private court gardens at the bathrooms are the only areas cultivated. The stone wall at the entrance leads you in from the south with an entrance gallery intersecting all the stone walls and spaces beyond, drama is added with light streaming in from the top and views confronting you to the right and left upon entering their spaces. The first space you intersect is the main living space, the dining room facing the koppie on the west and open plan kitchen hidden in the stonewall. To the east the living room extends out onto a covered terrace and open fire ring terrace with the view as its focus. The second space belongs to the kids with their bedrooms leading off their koppie. The rumpus room opens up onto the exercise lap pool framed by the stonewalls growing out of the water. The third, and more private, space belongs to the main bedroom suite, gym and guestroom/studio all with their private court gardens and bathrooms. Relaxed-muted, low maintenance finishes are used throughout with the red stone complimenting the client’s love for colour and texture. Sandstone planks are used in the bathrooms and outside areas where a non-slip surface is required. Granolithic floors make up the rest of the floor areas.


Design Office: Slee & Co. Architects
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Project Year: 2007
Photographs: Slee & Co. Architects


Double Bay House | Arent & Pyke

Double Bay House located in Sydney, Australia.

It was designed by  Arent & Pyke.

Descriprion by Arent & Pyke:

Bringing the personality and warmth of a young family into the cool interior of this bay-side house, the design posits communication and flow as essential to living. As such, the grand staircase was remade as a visually dynamic, perpetually unfurling line traversing the three floors.
Recomposing the home to both a human scale and aesthetic, the design called for a complete rethink of the living spaces. From the entry hall to the suite of rooms on the third floor, nuance and detail of design were layered into a new palette comprising timber flooring, generous rugs and generously proportioned furnishings in natural leather and linen.


Design Office: Arent & Pyke
Location: Sydney, Australia
Photographs: Felix Forest
Awards:
– IDEA Interior Design Excellence Awards
   Shortlist – Residential Interior Design

– Belle Coco Republic Interior Design Awards 2016
   WINNER – People’s Choice Awards for Best Residential Interior


 

Joly House | Stu/D/O Architects

The Joly House is located in Bangkok, Thailand.

It was designed by Stu/D/O Architects.

Description by Stu/D/O Architects:

This three-story house for a family of four has a footprint of 250 square meters and a height of 11 meters. It is located on the street corner in one of the most exquisite and densely populated residential areas of Bangkok. Flanked by rows of shophouses,main living spaces are elevated to the second floor to improve the visual conditions and allow rooms for service spaces on ground. Upon arrival, one is greeted with the skylights, through which shown the rippling strips of caustic patterns resulting from the interplay between lights and water of the swimming pool above. The changing time of the day contributes to the changing color of lights, making this parking space- the arrival space, more dynamic.

Built mainly with reinforced concrete structure and a partial steel frame, the project’s exterior is comprised of natural materials such as wood louver, glass panels, and exposed concrete. The more private spaces- the bedrooms, are located on the 3rd floor which external envelope is cladded with timber slats, giving extra privacy and security. This double-skinned façade acts as a sunshade, reducing the amount of heat collected in the building. Some of the slats are open-able panels; which, when opened, create wind walls and encourage natural ventilation. When the Jolys are away, the panels can be completely shut to protect their belongings from the heat and solar damage. While serving environmental purposes, the timber slats also add a warm but modern look to the house.


Design Office: Stu/D/O Architects
Interior Architect: Attapon Wiboonyanon
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
Area: 750.0 m2
Project Year: 2014
Structural Engineer: .N.G. Engineering Ordinary Partnerships
Photographs: Krisada Boonchaleow, Courtesy of Stu/D/O Architects, Chanin Limapornvanich


 

 

Toro Canyon House | Bestor Architecture

Toro Canyon House located in Santa Barbara Country, Usa.

It was designed by Bestor Architecture.

Description by Bestor Architecture:

The owners wanted to build a getaway house outside of Los Angeles where they could entertain and find a balance between the modern design they desired and a more direct relationship to nature. After a two year search in the Southern California region they discovered pristine acreage near Montecito at the top of a mountain and adjacent to national park land. The site strategy is one of slow revelation and discovery of the house and- ultimately- the view. The road, which had to be built for access, brings the visitor to a point below the house- where a formal stair leads up to the entry sequence. The front door frames and reveals views of the Santa Barbara coastline through the courtyard. A 40’ wide horizontal ‘panavison’-esque opening gives the house a pavilion-like atmosphere. The dwelling is organized around three courtyards; the primary one at the heart of the house also serves as the front entrance and outdoor living room. The courtyards have a dual purpose: they bring in ample natural light and ventilation but also provide protection from the strong winds that can race across the mountain. The rough and very thick boardform concrete walls, custom color-mixed to match the dark red and brown tones of the earth at the site, form a rugged shell that is punctuated by large openings and reveals of the Alaskan cedar wood siding. The inner shell’s warm wood and windows into the protected courtyards create a warm and tactile interior respite from the hardy environment.


Design Office             : Bestor Architecture  
Interior Designer      : The Archers
Landscape Architect: Isabelle Greene & Associates
Lighting Designer    : Dan Weinreber, Kaplan, Gehring, McCarroll Architectural Lighting
Contractor                  : Below Magid Construction
Location                      : Santa Barbara County, CA, USA
Project Year                : 2012
Photographs              : Laure Joliet


Piano House | LINE Architects

Piano House located in the suburbs of Chisinau, Moldova.

It was designed by LINE Architects.

Decsription by LINE Architects:

One-storey Pavilion of glass, concrete and wood located in the suburbs of Chisinau. Smooth stretch of trapezoidal shape is surrounded on 3 sides by the residental area, that dictated the shape of the House, but despite this plan forms the inner courtyard of the correct form of the pool over which hovers the design house.
Clear and concise exterior lines flow in the Interior of the House.
The House is spread over much of the area, all the houses are built around a courtyard.
In addition to the common zone in the House three bedrooms of which two babies and one my master bedroom with bathroom and dressing room, as well as auxiliary facilities and a games room.
Space home simply and discreetly.


Design Office: LINE Architects
Architects: Dmitriy Petrov, Lana Lika
Location: Chisinau, Moldova
Plot Area:550.80 m2
House Area: 264.20 m2
Main Structure: Reinforced concrete
Project Year : 2016


 

The Barrancas House | Ezequiel Farca architecture & design

The Barrancas House is located in Mexico City, Mexico.

It was design by Ezequiel Farca architecture & design in 2014.


Description by Ezequiel Farca:

The Barrancas House is the result of the restoration of a house built in the seventies in Mexico City, which didn´t have any attract at first but had great spatial potential.

It became a challenge for our office to create a home focusing on incredible attention to detail, modernity and discovery of the different spaces and levels to generate expectation and surprise.

We took advantage of the location of the house that has views towards the woods so we installed floor to ceiling windows so that natural elements from the exterior such as natural light, views to the woods become part of the interior without compromising the comfort and intimacy of the inhabitants.

The amenities for the family to enjoy inside the privacy of their home include a home theater, a wine cellar, a gym, 2 terraces, a pool, garden and green areas.

Discovering the house through the hallways, leads to multifunctional impredictible spaces achieved through movable screen walls , hidden doors, bay windows that open entirely, furniture designed especially for each space, automatic lightening system, for each need of the inhabitants.

The landscape was designed with plants that adjust to the local clima, with green roof and green walls, it also has a solar energy system and a automatized water saving system.

The materials used include marble, stone, wood, together with neutral tones as dark green or chocolate that give an earthy feeling that will integrate the interior with the exterior and create the sensation of unlimited space.


Design Office  : Ezequiel Farca architecture & design
Location           : Mexico City, Mexico
Architects        : Ezequiel Farca, Cristina Grappin, Fernanda de la Mora
Area                   : 720.00 m2
Project Year     : 2014

Photographs    : Jaime Navarro, Roland Halbe


Pryor Residence | Bates Masi + Architects

Pryor Residence located in Montauk, New York, Usa.

It was designed by Bates Masi + Architects in 2009.

 

Description by Bates Masi + Architects:

The house occupies a hill in Montauk with a distant view of ocean, a site that the owners, a couple with two young boys, spent years to find. It is the couple’s reprieve from their home in the city, to share the outdoor lifestyle with their family and to remember their teenage years together in Montauk. The house design prompts the owners to interact with the surrounding environment, evoking experiences of camping.
A departure from typical residential planning, the house is entered through multiple areas for different guests and occasions.

Large glass doors slide open to the living, dining and kitchen area for a large gathering; a smaller scaled swing door for an occasional guest opens to the center hall with a view of the ocean. A sequence of auxiliary spaces – beach equipment area, outdoor shower, sand and mudroom – creates a seamless ritual from the daily activities for the family and friends. In all living areas and bedrooms, glass doors and insect screens slide in and out from pocket walls, transforming rooms to screened porches or spaces completely open to the landscape.

The living area, a double height space with kitchen, dining and living area, has thirty-six feet wide glass doors that pocket into southern and northern walls. When open, the dining room becomes a picnic area and the living room fireplace becomes a campfire. Multiple layers of bronzed metal fabric at the clerestory windows in the living area fold and unfold to adjust sunlight for optimal brightness & temperature of the space. These operable architectural elements use the natural environment to create suitable living conditions.

The house is environmentally friendly in its overall construction and planning with such specifics as geo-thermal heating & cooling, shading & venting systems, solar panels, organic finishes and materials. Lending to the structure’s sustainability, the house is assembled, rather than built, with prefabricated foundation, panel siding and efficient built-ins minimizes construction debris or toxins such as concrete foundation tar on the site. With the owner’s initial premise of camping, the design and functionality of the house promotes a memorable experience for friends and family in the natural environment.


Design Office : Bates Masi + Architects
Location          :Montauk, New York, Usa
Area                  : 297,00 m2
Project year     : 2009
Photographs   : Bates Masi + Architects


White Lodge | Dyer Grimes Architects

The White Lodge is located in Tandridge, England, United Kingdom.

It was designed by Dyer Grimes Architects.

Description by Dyer Grimes Architects:

The site was originally home to a 1960s detached bungalow surrounded by tall trees and hedging with far reaching views to the Surrey Downs beyond. The area is populated by traditional pitched roof architecture typical of its green belt credentials.

The proposed designs were unprecedented in the immediate area and subject to Tanbridge Council’s strict planning requirements.

The site sloped sharply away to one side which would greatly limit the overall footprint of the building and the desired surrounding landscape.

Following a rigorous planning process, Dyer Grimes Architects achieved consent to infill and level the site and build a highly contemporary house of 480m2.

Modern building technologies were combined with the highest quality materials including hardwood cladding and white render with an abundance of glass throughout.

The glazed ground floor living space is surrounded by beautifully landscaped grounds, while the first floor appears to ‘hover’ over the kitchen dining area as well as project over the swimming pool.

Great emphasis was placed on constructing White Lodge in an environmentally friendly and sustainable way. An impressive sustainability target was set; to generate 20 percent of the energy required by using renewable energy sources.

Energy efficiency has been maximised through the incorporation of Solar hot water collectors on the roof, a highly sustainable drainage system and an air source heat pump which circulates heat around the entire house.

The result is a stunning modernist home which has won the admiration of the local community, the Council and the media alike.

Video:

 Project Awards:
  • 2013 Best Family Home – British Homes Awards by Sunday Times
  • 2013 Highly Commended – Best Residential Architectural Property Award – International Design & Architecture Awards
  • 2013 Highly Commended – Best Family Home Award – Evening Standard, New Homes Awards.
  • 2012 Highly Commended – Architecture Single Residence South East – International Property Awards.

Design Office    : Dyer Grimes Architects
Location             : Tandridge, England, United Kingdom
Area                    : 480.0 m2
Photographs     : Dyer Grimes Architects

Summerhouse in Santorini | Kapsimalis Architects

 

Design Office: Kapsimalis Architects

Location: Santorini, Greece

Photographs: Julia Klimi

Residence in Mykonos | Deborah French Designs

Design Office: Deborah French Designs

Location: Mykonos, Greece

Photographs: Paul Ryan

Residence In Syros, Greece | Block722

Description by Block722:

Situated in the island of Syros, this summer house hosts a family of four and their guests. In contrast to the neighbouring Syros I residence, the steep and intense topography dominated the design process.

 A massive staircase leads to a gradual descent from the top towards the house, intensifying the experience of the cycladic landscape. The entrance is surrounded by the higher volumes of the main areas of the house, ending the descent path, then opening immediately to an ample view of the Aegean.

 Programmaticaly, the house is clearly divided into the clean and square volume of the common areas (living room, kitchen) and the partially buried rectangular volume of the bedrooms. The guesthouse is also buried inside the slope, defined by a stone wall that is typical of the local archihtecture. The main volume is characterized by a free floor plan, allowing the continuous view of the outside and offering a cosy living space near the fireplace. The outdoor common spaces include two open “courtyards” shielded from the sun and the central part of the court, open to sunbathing and the children’s plays.

Design Office: Block722

Location: Syros, Grrece

Photographs: Erieta Attali, Ioanna Roufopoulou

TM House | Studio Arthur Casas

Design Office: Studio Arthur Casas

Location: Recife, Brazil

Photographs:  Leonardo Finotti

Summer House in Antiparos | Katerina Tsigarida Architects

Description by Katerina Tsigarida Architects:

PNG I and II  have been inspired by Antiparos landscape, which has been designed, for ages, by “pezoules” (short stone walls). They are located in the east part of the island, facing the island of Paros, and looking straight ahead to the Aegean Sea.
They have been conceived as buildings which naturally emerge through the archetypical cycladic landscape. Stone walls which follow the natural curves of the landscape, organize the interior and exterior life of the summer house. Open and closed spaces are described as a combination of platforms “platomata” scattered along narrow streets, footpaths, designed by “pezoules”. Walking along these footpaths, everyday, is divided into all the expanses of life in summer; from public space to privacy, from sun to shadow, from wind to silence.
The houses adopt the characteristics of a concave and a convex wall, that opens itself to the view, following the terrain.

Design Office: Katerina Tsigarida Architects

Location: Panagia, Antiparos, Greece

 

Kate’s House | Bower Architecture

Description by Bower Architecture:

Kate’s House is a single storey extension and renovation to a 1960’s house, entered through a side courtyard sanctuary which separates the retained part of the existing dwelling and the new addition. Bagged brick walls and sculptural use of timber typify the use of raw yet restrained materials that combine with the fine grain offered by brass and steel detailing. Living and private zones are defined by a series of high gallery spaces which naturally light and ventilate the house, while vividly tiled bathrooms are treated as discovered gems. The house maintains a continuous connection to landscape and garden as it terraces down the site to a lower family level, leading to the dramatic pool area beyond.

Video:

Design Office: Bower Architecture

Location: Australia

Photographs: Shannon McGrath

Summer house in Paros, Greece | Alexandros Logodotis

Description by Alexandros Logodotis:

Daylight reveals the plasticity of tumor and white colors as watercolors have spread in selected areas, while at night the lights in headlights and other details throughout the building becomes a supernatural setting, hovering over the pool. The orientation is East and spaces organized in turn by the sun to “live” the best of their era: the outdoor kitchen has shade in the afternoon to be able to enjoy a meal in peace. The building appears to volume configured by touch, without straights and tight corners – as if it was slowly over time, with the wind and rain. The smooth curves and holes, the white Cycladic which eliminates the strong light and color harmonies, is what characterizes the area “breathe” the breeze coming through the openings. The center of gravity of the house seems to be the staircase stands like a sculpture. Patiti, gray concrete into alternating with marble tiling and signage in the area around the pool, sand-colored, covered the floors. The house and minimal ergonomic, ideal for anyone who went immediately into the atmosphere, which is something ethereal and water together. Accountable designed built shelves in the living room, a dining room buffet abstract and built beds, without spikes. The minimum-which has nothing but the usual rigor than tenderness and eroticism, is what fits the temperament of their owners and possibly only “ties” with such an advantageous position, as the Cyclades.

 

Design Office: Alexandros Logodotis

Location: Paros Island, Cyclades, Greece

 

Harbour Front Residence | Hess Hoen

Design Office: Hess Hoen

Location: New South Wales, Australia

Orama Residence | Smart Design Studio

Description by Smart Design Studio:

The transformation of ‘Orama’, a gracious Victorian villa in Sydney’s Woollahra was a welcome opportunity to work once again with the family for whom Smart Design Studio renovated ‘Mandolong House’ on the lower north shore. Our brief was to enhance and expand the historic house to suit the changed needs of the family.
Built in two stages, the project addressed the original villa as a distinct entity, housing bedrooms, bathrooms, formal living and study spaces. Beautifully-crafted elements of the historic house, such as fireplaces and early paint schemes, were retained. Other parts of the villa were updated with sensitively-chosen fittings and fixtures to bring out the best of the old building. The design approach was to make the old house feel trim, white, and tailored. By contrast, the new addition was designed to be minimal in form and detail, with textured raw concrete extending from the walls out into the garden, punctuated by swathes of water (the pool), vegetation, lawn, and pebbles.
A striking double-height living room forms the nucleus of the extension. Six-metre tall windows on the northern side flood the room with light, overcoming the limitations of the south-facing site. We were fortunate in that the owners have an incredible art collection. The bare concrete walls, and gracious rooms of the old house provide a dramatic setting for this. The space of the living room flows into a well-appointed stainless steel kitchen, and into the garden and swimming pool beyond. Upstairs, a guest bedroom and chic bathroom occupy the glassy link between the old and new parts of the house.
The new wing has been designed and built with the same intricacy, attention to detail, and superb craftsmanship as the original villa, applied to modern methods of construction. The materials palette of concrete, glass, dark steel, and zinc beautifully complements the chic black-and-white scheme applied to the historic house.
Environmentally sensitive elements were stitched into the old and new parts of the house, including hydronic floor heating and cooling, natural cross ventilation and an avoidance of air-conditioning, exploitation of good solar orientation, thermally massive construction, and heat-exchange technology.
Separated by a century and a half, the two parts of ‘Orama’ stand as beautiful expositions of the best construction standards of their day.

Design Office: Smart Design Studio

Location: Woollahra, Australia