Alps Villa | Camillo Botticini Architect

Alps Villa, a house with an irregular plan shaped like a “C”, located in Brescia, Italy.

It was designed by Camillo Botticini Architect.

Description by Camillo Botticini Architect:

The house stands on a clearing in the trees, 700 meters above sea level, close to the “Passo del Cavallo”, next to a road that connects Trompia Valley and Sabbia Valley on a steep slope. The landscape is characterized by an open valley to the south and a frame of green mountains with peaks of dolomite rock to the north.
We are still in a place close to the urban noise but at the same time far away, where the aroma of mountain herbs and grazing sheep seem to have stopped time; and this determines which condition founding: a primary relationship between the artificial intervention and nature.

The relationship with the ground and the landscape are the material that construct the project: the ground by communicating with the project operates a principle of “rootedness” into the slope to the north, where the house seems to bite the mountain, and the principle of “emancipation “to the south, with an overhang that throw the home to the valley.
To the north, a courtyard open to the Mount allows you to look at the profile of the dolomite rock spiers that at 1200 m above sea level continues the green plane tilted so that virtually close the fourth side of the house.
To the south a large window splayed mediates between the interior of the living and landscape, the light coming from the south continued with a bay window to the north patio.

Lightweight, integration at the site, opening and closing, no exhibitionism, connection to foundational principle generated by the performance of the ground and the internal organization of space, producing an idea of domestic that offers a contemporary housing responsive to the site.
These are the elements that make up the set, with a will of harmony and tension, looking for an architectural shape by the strong expressive intensity, but at the same time a shape of balance and rooting in the use of natural materials such as oxidized copper and wood.

The house has an irregular plan shaped like a “C” with a patio where the fourth side is made from a green plane that delivers the planimetric structure that generates the spaces of the house, creating three bodies with variable height increasing from north-est, where the volume disappears by integrating into the ground.
The first body has three bedrooms, two of them with windows facing the patio, through the bathroom; while the third bedroom has a subtracting that opens the master bedroom and its bathroom to the east into the clearing.
To the south of the second body with a height between 3.50 and 4.50 meters introduces the living room, and open space suspended between the patio and landscape. Its side closed is characterized by the presence of a fireplace that ends with a the same size the south window.
The living room continues with the dining area, to the west with the double height body: a continuous space, characterized by a structured cover consists by triangular planes, inside which is recessed the continuous lighting system.

The highest part of the body in the west is characterized by a loft under which it has the kitchen opens to the patio, while above it there is a space for the study.

It creates an integrated fluid area and open to the outside, simultaneously protected, almost closed on the east and west sides (where they open the window as an excavation of the room and bathroom).

Important the levels of access. The main, covered by the overhang of three meters of living, is placed in the to the south-east. Upon entering there is a ramp parallel to a great room with fireplace. Here goes a ladder to the dining room level and then to the mezzanine, where a skylight opens to the sky at north.

Access by road has two possibilities.
A driveway with covered ramp leading cars in the underground, which is one level below the main floor access. The pedestrian access is constituted by a suspended linear scale made of steel, from the road a space covered leads to the entry level.
An elevator connects the level of the garage with that of the living. Spaces and service areas are located in the basement. The house looks like in his primary relationship with the landscape without other artificial elements other than the suspended staircase that cuts the grass slope.

Geothermal system, heat pump, ventilated walls, creating a natural ventilation even though the deep walls (65 cm) that protect against cold and heat (energy italian rating higher than A+ cened) help to build a house with very low heating costs, almost to consumption and zero pollution.
We wanted an environmentally friendly home in the building materials and insulation, equipped with ventilated walls, a sustainable home in the settlement balance with the landscape.

Green meadows and trees framing the outer coating in corrugated oxide copper and Accoya wood (patented of undeformable wood of New Zealand pine replanted forest), the only elements that, with the triple room glass, are the artifice in counterpoint that interacts with nature.

The ventilated wall copper is modulated with a slight pleating to vibrate the light on the non-reflecting surface. The wood of the great splay reflects light that is refracted from the south.

The patio flooring made in iroko wood, the large windows integrated into the copper coating defines a space that is enhanced by a green maple that brings in a piece of nature, are not material around which you orient the house.

Inside, the floors are made of resin sand-colored, the walls are in plasterboard painted white and ceilings with recessed lights in the graft cut from the slab-wall, parapet are in glass and the windows made of painted iron have the objective of exalting the space and its continuity, favoring the integration to the site.


Design Office: Camillo Botticini Architect
Location: Brescia, Italy
Area: 360,00 m2
Construction Company: Baglioni Costruzioni Slr, Gardone Vt (Bs)
Structural Engineering: Franco Palmieri
Project Years: 2012 – 2014
Photographs: Nicolo Galeazzi


 

Lake House | Dransfeldarchitekten

This lake house is located in Steckborn, Switzerland.

It was designed by Dransfeldarchitekten.


Design Office: Dransfeldarchitekten

Location: Steckborn, Switzerland

Photographs: Dransfeldarchitekten


 

The Whittaker Cube | Dravitzki & Brown

The Whittaker Cube is located in Kakanui, New Zealand.

It was designed by Dravitzki & Brown in 2016.

Description by Dravitzki & Brown:

Located in the small seaside settlement of Kakanui, near Oamaru, the design challenge required a concept that would make the most of the beautiful sea views and sunlight, while balancing the need for privacy from neighbouring properties and the street. The challenge also included working to a small footprint, while maximising the comfort of interior living spaces.

The Whittaker Cube was designed as two levels of just 8 metres x 8 meters with immaculate detailing of durable materials and a cost effective structure. Despite the compact footprint, the design incorporates three bedrooms, while upper level living achieves a light and spacious feel with American Oak featuring throughout the modern interior.

Cedar cladding provides an effective rain screen and allows flashings to be cleverly concealed, while also lending the exterior a simple uncluttered look.


Design Office                  : Dravitzki & Brown
Location                           : Kakanui, New Zealand
Area                                  : 142.00 m2
Project Year                    : 2016
Landscaping Designer : Paul Whittaker
Photographs                   : Alister Brown


 

Villa Kristina | Wingardhs

Villa Kristina located in Gothenburg, Sweden.

It was designed by Wingardhs.

Description by Wingardhs:

A small house that wants to be big. A small footprint and simple construction means low cost. That’s the idea when we set about designing a house for a young couple on a site surrounded by other single-family homes on the west side of Gothenburg.

We turn inward with an atrium scheme, away from the view of—and from—the neighbors. The nicest view is toward the mature trees and the exposed bedrock in the southwest, so we open the courtyard up on that side.

The building is perched lightly on piers, hovering a half-meter over granite bedrock honed by the ice age. That means that to reach the building we need a stair and a ramp (accessibility requirement) along the blank northeast side. The elevated floor of the atrium courtyard is built up of decking over beams, with steps down to the surrounding terrain.

On the inside, it’s the outside that dominates. The narrow kitchen with its long table is always a part of the changing seasons that play out in the courtyard. Floor-to-ceiling glass and broad sliding doors help erase the boundary between inside and out. Okay, it’s a cliché—but it works.

There’s a steep ladderway up to the workroom (yes, there’s a glimpse of the sea from up there) and a shallow, almost monumentally processional stair up to a roof terrace. Additional rooms could be built around the courtyard if needed in the future to accommodate a bunch of children.

The entrance wall is thickened to hold a fireplace (the chimney is part of the roof landscape) with a built-in sofa, a room for collections, the kitchen (back-to-back with the exterior mechanical room), and an air-lock entry with guest bathroom.

The exterior is clad entirely in whitewashed (Sioo treated) smooth-planed spruce. It will age to a pale gray.

Design Office    : Wingardhs
Architects          : Wingardh Arkitektkontor, Gert and Karin Wingardh:
Location             : Gothenburg, Sweden
Area                    : 182.00 m2
Project Year      : 2014
Photographs     : James Silverman

Floating Farmhouse | Tom Givone

The Floating Farmhouse is located in Eldred, New York, USA.

It was designed by Tom Givone.

Design Office    : Tom Givone

Location             : Eldred, New York, USA

Photographs    : Marlene Rounds

McClelland Residence | Imbue Design

McClelland Residence is located in Salt Lake City, Utah, Usa.

It was designed by Imbue Design in 2010.

 

 

Design Office           : Imbue Design
Location                    : Salt Lake City, Utah, Usa
General Contractor : Domain Design Build
Area                            : 3,200 ft2
Completion date      : 2010
Photographs             : Courtesy of Imbue Design

 

Bush House | Archterra Architects

Bush House is located in Margaret River, Australia.

It was designed by Archterra Architects.

 

Description by Archterra Architects:

Located in an existing clearing within a section of remnant marri/ jarrah bushland this owner-built bush pavilion seeks to distill into built form, the feelings of camping under a simple sheltering tarp

Diagrammatically, the houses’ simple rectangular plan is separated east-west into sleeping and living zones and delineated by a change in floor level and a grounding rammed earth wall that continues thru the house into the outdoors.

Taking cues from the Californian cases study houses of the 40s, 50s and 60s, a 3.6m structural grid locates prefabricated steel frames that enabled the main support structure to be erected in a day and for infill timber framing to be subsequently carried out by the owner-builder within these frames under the protection of a simple single roof plane. The galvanised steel framing is expressed both internally and externally and its mottled patina continues to change as it ages.

Environmental sustainability is intrinsic to the design: passive measures such as efficient cross flow ventilation for summer cooling and calculated eaves overhangs for warming winter sun penetration are teamed with active measures such as power self sufficiency from a 3kW ground mounted solar array, a solar hot water system and a worm farm blackwater filtration system that irrigates the garden with nutrient rich water.

External materials were selected to be largely self finishing to minimise maintenance: zincalume steel, rammed earth, glass – all decking is recycled jarrah.

 

Design Office: Archterra Architects

Location: Margaret River, Australia

Photographs: Douglas Mark Black

 

House in New Zealand | Paul Rolfe Architects

 

Design Office: Paul Rolfe Architects

Location: York Bay, New Zealand

Photographs: Mike Rolfe Photography

Arne Garborgsveg 18 | TYIN Architects

Design Office: TYIN Architects

Location: Trondheim, Norway

Photographs: Pasi Aalto

Montauk Beach House | Space Exploration Design

Description by Space Exploration Design:

This threestory, split level house for a young family is nestled atop a densely wooded bluff in Montauk, New York, surrounded by sumac and spruce trees. Space Exploration designed an open kitchen on the top floor of the house to act as a flexible social center for the house, and to maximize the site’s dramatic views of Fort Pond and Fort Pond Bay, the nearby bodies of water that dominate the view. Floor toceiling sliding doors and a large rectangular skylight flood the space with an abundance of natural light. Countertops of marinegrade Baltic birch plywood — originally intended to be temporary — eventually won over the owners, who have decided to keep them.

The kitchen table is a repurposed marble slab, which previously topped an island (since demolished) in the owner’s home in Brooklyn. The faucet and sink are by Rohl, and the brass pulls in the kitchen are actually towel holders by the Japanese brand Futagami. The owners wanted their house to have a light, unpretentious, casual feel befitting a beach house in the historically sleepy surfing town of Montauk, where it stands. To help them achieve that end, throughout the house Space Exploration employed a material palette of light, neutral colors and pale woods, which combine to create a tranquil, airy atmosphere that showcases an eclectic collection of furniture and objects, collected by the owners during travels to Morocco, Europe and Central America. A lone primitive wooden dining chair, abandoned by the house’s previous owners, sits happily in the mix.

The lower floor houses the children’s bedroom, a home office, and a sunken “solarium,” or recreation room, that opens directly to the house’s sprawling grounds. Walnut shelving on this level is by Atlas Industries. The children’s bathroom floor was finished with salvaged antique encaustic tiles . Other design strategies included relocating and expanding windows in several rooms to better frame views and emit light. Window systems with minimal jamb detailing were selected to emphasize the connection between indoors and outdoors.Flooring throughout the top two floors (entry level and upstairs kitchen) is wideplank red oak, blanched and stained nearly white.

On the lower level, the floor is highquality plywood finished with glossy white epoxy. Gubi sconces illuminate the walls on the top two floors, and for the bathrooms, Space Exploration specified plumbing trims from the “Henry” collection, by Waterworks. In order to preserve an honest, informal feeling in the architecture, Space Exploration chose to expose and express the house’s structure wherever possible, and conceived a new wooden stair that mirrors the simple construction vernacular of the floor framing, newly visible on the entry level.

 

Design Office: Space Exploration Design

Location: New York, Usa

 

Private Residence | O Interior Design

Design Office: O Interior Design

Location: LoHi, Denver, Colorado, Usa

 

Stratford Creek | Matt Garcia Design

Design Office: Stratford Creek

Location: Texas, Usa

Photographs: Casey Dunn

Sunshine Canyon Residence | Hacker Architects


Design Office: Hacker Architects

Location: Boulder, Colorado, Usa

Photographs: Jeremy Bittermann

The Riparian House | Architecture Brio


Description by Architecture Brio:

The Riparian House is placed below the crest of a hillock at the foothills of the Ghats near Mumbai. The top of a vegetated roof merges with the top of the hillock, hiding the house while approaching. Inside the house one can nevertheless enjoy the views to the north of the Irshalgad hill fortress and towards the west, the sunset while the river winds its way across the agricultural fields.

Design Office: Architecture Brio

Location: Karjat, Mumbai, India

Photographs: Ariel Huber

Lone Madrone | Heliotrope Architects

Description by Heliotrope Architects:

Located on a rocky, wind-swept south facing shoreline; this 1,600sf retreat home nestles into the landscape in order to harmonize with it’s surroundings and minimize exposure to weather. Designed with retractable wall panels to protect from punishing winter storms, the house nevertheless opens up completely to the outdoors when the weather is fair — allowing the owners to fully interact with the landscape and view. The site is within the San Juan Islands National Monument, with extremely sensitive shorelines and marine environment. In order to minimize impacts to natural systems, a garden roof was employed to replace landscape lost to construction, and storm-water flows were engineered to replicate the pre-construction condition. Local materials (primarily douglas fir and western red cedar) and local craftspeople were utilized in all aspects of the project.

Design Office: Heliotrope Architects

Location: Orcas Island, Washington, Usa

Photographs: Sean Airhart

Evill House | Studio Pacific Architecture

Design Office: Studio Pacific Architecture

Location: Tasman Bay, New Zealand

Photographs: Paul McCredie

Weekend House | Pokorny Architekti

Description by Pokorny Architekti:

At the very beginning of the weekend house’s design was client’s quite vague idea of a “Slovak traditional wooden house somewhere in the mountains of Central Slovakia”.

We ran a thorough analysis of the available facts and at the end we decided, that as our client lives in a little village Nosice, but works in Slovak’s capital plus he owns a nice area right behind his current house overlooking the local mountains Javorniky, the most logical thing (to avoid yet more travelling with the family over the weekend) would be to build his weekend house there, where he lives, right in his existing garden in Nosice.

The core of the weekend house is a two storeys high gathering/living/eating space with a tile stove. This core is functionally extended by a roofed atrium and wellness area on the ground floor and two loftlike bedrooms on the 2nd floor.

The construction is made of layered and insulated wood pannels on the critical corners reinforced via steel profiles. The interior/exterior concept is based on the original idea (“traditional wooden house”) visually transformed in the fully wooden skin as from the outside (thermo pine) so from the inside (larch slabs) together with a up to date furnishing.

 

Design Office: Pokorny Architekti

Location: Nosice, Slovakia

Photographs: Dano Veselsky