Planchonella House | Jesse Bennett Architect

The Planchonella House, a 280,0 m2  home with joyful spaces, is located in Queensland, Australia.

It was designed by Jesse Bennett Architect in 2014.

Description by Jesse Bennett Architect:

Planchonella House was designed with a simple idea in mind- to create a series of joyful spaces to inspire and enrich daily life. Set in tropical north Queensland, the house embraces the heritage rainforest surrounds and utilises experimental passive design methods. The simplistic approach and use of Lo-Fi technologies results in a raw and honest dwelling.

Contours of the site ridgeline have formed basis for the playful lines utilised in concrete profiles. As not to protrude out with the ridge, the profile is mirrored and cuts back in to the ridge. Visual amenity from surrounding lower areas has been maintained with this design in that rather than creating a dominant form on the landscape, it tucks back in at the critical highest most revealing point. The wings created each side of the ridge float into the surrounding rainforest and become part of the tree canopy.

The large flat roof with generous overhang acts as a rainforest canopy above, minimal walls and columns in between allow for un-obstructed views and moments to be shared with the landscape. This omission of boundaries between inside and outside gives an openness and quality of space that is surreal, living completely within and engulfed by a beautiful landscape. The resolution of plan follows a purely functional approach to use of space, privacy, visual connection and passive design principles.

The plan wraps around the courtyard space, which is considered the second hearth (after the kitchen) or perhaps lungs to the entire dwelling. The courtyard contributes much to the house and its occupants, it is an oasis that provides sun, light, ventilation, happiness, activity, visual stimulation, and entertainment. It also provides connection to the surrounding rainforest, connection from one part of the house to another, and acts as the focal node to the promenade experience of moving through the house.


Design Office: Jesse Bennett Architect
Location: Queensland, Australia
Interior Designer: Anne-Marie Campagnolo
Area: 280.0 m2
Project Year: 2014
Photographs: Sean Fennessy


NPL. Penthouse | Olga Akulova Design

Description by Olga Akulova Design:

  Completely new 30th level house, in the condominium «Novopecherskie Lipki», has a few Penthouses about 150m2-250m2 (1,614ft2-2,691ft2) each. One of them became an investment property for my client. Young man who used to live in Spain and lives partly in Latvia, has got an idea to create this space as a perfect area for himself and for party time with his few friends.
Detached concrete ceiling and the glass wall – windows, were from the very beginning of the Project brief.
Another key aspect of the brief was to build an interior without client control, as he had not much time. The client asked me to organize an open space area with natural materials and a “Clever House” system, which can control the temperature, security system, lighting and television. Natural materials with oak/elm-tree structure were used on the walls and kitchen island. Minacciolo / Natural Skin Kitchen was agreed with the first steps of the Project.
For the island top we used sheet metal matching the colour to the concrete ceiling and framework columns. The interior was developed with huge windows, which provided amazing views of the City, Dnieper River and Sky.
The enormous sheet slide glass and wooden doors in the bedroom were maneuvered through an opening to connect bedroom the to the guest-room. The drapery “Designers Guild” with a “Black Out” function, along the sliding glass door, shuts sun light from outside is controlled by the “Clever House” system program on IPad. A monolithic white rectangle in the middle of the guestroom separating the living room and the wardrobe area contains the open wooden Fireplace “Waco and Co” and a hidden television, while part of the wardrobe utilities are concealed inside this long shape on the opposite site of the television area.
The bathroom area is separated from bedroom by a glass sliding door that allows the view from the bedroom and cabinet to the garden on the bathroom wall. Lighting and watering are switched on automatically from the laundry.
A white metal structure in the front of the wall plants, elongate the bathroom area and consist of a table with a black long ceramic sink and step to the wooden bath “Agape”

Design Office: Olga Akulova Design

Location: Kiev, Ukraine

Photographs: Andrey Avdeenko

House in Russia | Poshvykinyh Architects

Design Office: Poshvykinyh Architects

Location: Moscow, Russia

Photographs: Mads Mogensen

Bloom house | Greg Lynn

Description by Greg Lynn:

The Bloom House is an infill house situated on a 35’x90’ lot with views of the Pacific Ocean.

The exterior is a box with a series of eyelet shaped windows with stainless steel trimming the outer edge of the windows.

The trim runs continuously along the east and west facades and turns the corners to the north and south facades where corner windows are located.

The interior of the house is massed with curvilinear surfaces which emerge from ceilings and walls to define enclosures, furniture and light.

There are 2-1/2 stories with the garage, maid’s room and utility rooms located on the submerged level.

On the first full level the living room, dining room and kitchen terrace up from the front yard at 30” height intervals.

Across the length of this open space is a luminous fiberglass lantern attached to the ceiling.

Between the dining room and kitchen are 2 small curvilinear enclosures which contain the powder room and office. In the living room, a wall bulges to define the fireplace.

Three bedrooms are located on the upper level along a spine of shaped walls. In the master bathroom, master bedroom and second bathroom, the walls are shaped from thermoformed Corian.

The upper hallway wall, the 2 small enclosures and fireplace on the lower level are framed with laser cut vertical wood fins that are sheathed with lath and plaster.

 

Design Office: Greg Lynn

Location: Los Angeles, California, Usa

Photographs: Richard Powers

 

A Single Family House | Christian von Düring architecte


Description by Christian von Düring architecte:

The challenge of this project was to integrate a large program on a relatively narrow plot while maintaining usable outdoor surfaces. An additional concern, was that the access to the plot being from the south, a solution had to be found to manage an entrance while ensuring privacy for the indoor and outdoor spaces.

The solution proposes two volumes on the ground floor, respectively a garage to the north and the living area to the south, connected above by a volume containing the bedrooms. In addition to the terrace to the south, the area resulting from the bridging of these two volumes offers a generous covered entry suitable for various activities. The house is accessed by a slightly elevated drive way that follows the western property line, bypassing the terrace and entering the house from the rear covered area.

Once inside, one is immediately faced with an open suspended staircase connecting to the above volume, through which one perceives a large room open onto the garden containing a kitchen with its large dining table and a spacious living room. Upstairs, a corridor running along the west facade connects the bedrooms and a central play-room. At each end there is a large bedroom with a balcony open to the outside. One overlooks the south terrace, while the other projects into the forest line bordering the plot.

The building is comprised of ground floor masonry volumes on which is placed a wooden structure made of two large trusses spanning the entire length. The insulated triangulated framework freely runs on the inside of the windows and provides a deep sill.

Composed of pre-grayed squared larch rods, the horizontal open joint cladding of the upper floor accentuates its longitudinal expression in order to reduce its volumetric impact. Placed at a 45 degree angle, the rods amplify this effect by the resulting shadows and in the long-term the aging will increase this effect due to the different exposures to the rain and sun.

Design Office: Christian von Düring architecte

Location: Tannay, Switzerland

Photographs: Thomas Jantscher