Metaphysical Remix | Marcante – Testa / UdA Architetti

This renovated, 250 m2, apartment is located in Via Roma in the centre of Turin, Italy.

It was designed by architects Andrea Marcante and Adelaide Testa of  UdA Architetti.

Description by UdA Architetti:

The project designed by Andrea Marcante (the founder of Italian office UDA Architetti) and Adelaide Testa to restructure an approximately 250 m² rented apartment in Via Roma in the centre of Turin attempts to meet the needs of three generations: a father, his daughters and grandfather enjoying the rituals of everyday life under the same roof while, at the same time, having their own private spaces designed to meet their individual needs.
Marcante’s and Testa’s joint project is based on very close, constant and stimulating interaction with the clients bringing their own specific requirements in line with the setting in which this house, built from 1935-1937, is located. Having discovered that the interiors had completely lost all their original features, the perception of space and precision found in rationalist architecture and metaphysical painting from that period were inevitably sources of inspiration for the project designed by the architects.
The attempt to reproduce them in different proportions and using different materials can be seen in the plaster truss at the entrance that evokes the coffered portico in Via Roma. Similarly, the distortions in perspective of the ceiling in the dining area, created using stucco work and wallpaper, pay tribute to De Chirico’s dreamy, oneiric language and the plaster cornices framing the ceiling are reproduced in new patterns capable of identifying the specific functions below, regardless of the configurations of the walls.
The evocative force of the artist, who painted distinctive features of classical cities, most notably the empty colonnades and perspectives along roads and avenues he discovered walking around Turin, also suggests the geometric patterns of the new system of metal bars spreading through the various rooms and altering how their space is perceived: frames with glass shelves holding valuable objects, which, starting from the entrance, project into the lounge where they hold books and conceal the rear doors, not to mention the micro-architecture in the bedroom displaying a sort of re-found classicism: these historical citations are hinted at and interpreted but never philological.
A remix playing on a combination of conventional systems, design inventions and modern-day features ranging from the colour scheme (pastel and florescent shades) to designer furniture (by the likes of Prouvé, Sarfatti, Mendini and Tom Dixon) and design objects.
A house/stage where all the actors move easily: bedrooms to safeguard privacy but also shared spaces designed in languages holding onto what we hold dearest and, at the same time, stimulating interaction between different generations through unusual and unexpected architectural features.
As Alfred Hitchcock said when he visited Turin in 1960 “… it is rather mysterious and intriguing and even though I’ve only just got here, it looks promising and something unexpected might suddenly happen on any of its street corners…” We would also like to invite you to discover the unusual and unfamiliar perspectives this house-stage has to offer.


Design Office: UdA Architetti
Architects: Andrea Marcante, Adelaide Testa
Collaborators: Eirini Giannakopoulou, Giada Mazzero
Area: 250.0 m2
Location: Turin, Italy
Project Year: 2015
Photographs: Carola Ripamonti


AC Project | Ameiva Studio

Design Office: Ameiva Studio

Location: Tokyo, Japan

 

House in Japan | ASO Style

Design Office: ASO Style

Location: Japan

 

Itoman Gyomin Syokudo Restaurant | Yamazaki Kentaro Design

Design Office: Yamazaki Kentaro Design

Location: Okinawa, Japan

Photographs: Nahoko Koide

A House in Kisami | Florian Busch Architects

Description by Florian Busch Architects:

The ‘A’ House in Kisami is a private retreat overlooking the ocean at the southernmost tip of the Izu Peninsula, about 180km south of Tokyo. Located at the end of a tiny mountain road leading up a coastal hill, the site is on a steep slope with stunning views and sounds of the sea.

A young couple, both outdoor enthusiasts, asked for a simple retreat set in the outside that would give them and their children a stark contrast to their daily lives in downtown Tokyo.

With most of the site sloped at 30 degrees and less than a tenth flat, the project started with carving out the mountain. Placing a small volume into the resultant trapezoidal carved-out void, and a larger one on top turns the mountain void into the centre of the house: a spa zone in the mountain between the platonic volumes housing bedrooms on the lower and living on the upper level. The volumes themselves defy their mass as they rotate around an inconspicuous pivot, the void of the spiral staircase that connects the cave with the sky.

When the spaces in-between become the building’s essence, it is hard not to realise that architecture is not about objects.

The built only frames this essence: the exterior space that flows through the building, down the mountain and connects the A House with the sea.

Design Office: Florian Busch Architects

Location: Kisami, Japan

Photographs: Florian Busch Architects, Hiroyasu Sakaguchi (AtoZ)

House in Yatsugatake Mountains, Japan | Kidosaki Architects Studio

Description by Kidosaki Architects Studio:

Located on a sloping mountain ridge at the foot of the Yatsugatake Mountains, this house was designed on a piece of land that offers spectacular views that are rarely known. Seeking for the best in picturesque scenery, the client took up residence in Tateshina, and spent many years searching for the ideal site for building his house.Inevitably, the main aim of this project is to meet the client’s expectations to incorporate these stunning views in to the design.

When I visited the site, my first impression was that this untapped and expansive nature must be embraced into the interior to the greatest extent possible. I decided to arrange the house in such that this horizontal expanded scenery must be maximized. In order to realize this design, I introduced mega structures column enabling half of the house to extend into the air. To support this large overhanging floor, 2 diagonal bracing steel cylinders, each 300 mm in diameter is introduced. With this, the house is floats in to the midst of a glorious natural surroundings. With this overhanging structure, the breeze of the mountain plateau flow through the interior, makes you coexistent with nature.

When you are invited to the entranceway, after passing through the restrained space of the hallway, and as you enter in to this dramatic space, magnificent and impressive scenery spreads out before your eyes. Living / dining / kitchen area, the majestic panoramic view extends on all three sides is something you can’t find anywhere else, but here in this space. And the scenery is all to your own.

This space is an extravagant experience that only those who have given a privilege to be invited can truly enjoy. Other rooms are planed to offer differing views of the mountains, enabling a variety of views from each of the rooms. The high ceilings and wide wood deck and eaves enable a space steeped in the overwhelming presence of the panoramic views of the area.The feeling is so intense that it is almost as if you are living on a cloud.

The various components have been elevated through careful attention to detailing, and the refinement of the structure gives a sense of tension and unity to the space and adequate materials, achieving the proper balance between a dominance over and a harmony with the surrounding natural environment. The character and humility of this dwelling, constructed without compromising the vision of the architect, expresses a dignified reverence for the scenery surrounding it.

Design Office: Kidosaki Architects Studio

Location: Nagano, Japan

Photographs: Junji Kojima

Yusuhara Machino-eki | Kengo Kuma and associates

Hotel and market in the mountains of Japan.

Description by Kengo Kuma and associates:

Yusuhara Machino-eki is a complex of a market selling local products and a small hotel with 15 rooms. Combining the two different functions via atrium, a new core facility was born for the town of 3,900 in the mountains. Yusuhara is widely known as the town facing a main road used by Sakamoto Ryoma, a high-minded warrior of the region who contributed to the initiation of the Meiji Restoration (big political reform). Along the road, there existed a number of greenrooms called “Chad Do” for travelers, which functioned not only as restrooms but also as a kind of cultural salon, serving teas free of charge. As an attempt to respect this history, we used thatch as the material, which is deeply related to “Cha Do,” which worked as a medium to connect the past with the present. Glass fittings are used for the lower part of the building, including the market’s entrance facing the front road, which can be open at any hour of the day, and on top of it come piles of the straw unit in the module of 2,000×980mm, an unprecedented form for a curtain wall. Normally in a thatched roofing, thatch is fixed vertically against the foundation, in which its cut ends face towards outside. In this building, however, the bunch of thatch is bound horizontally to the foundation, with which the cut end won’t be exposed to rainfalls, and will last long. As another device, pivots are set on the steel mullion at the both ends of each thatch unit, so that it can rotate and take in fresh air from outside, which will the maintenance of the thatch easier. For the interior, we used logs of cedar tree with some remained astringent skin. The remain of the astringent was controlled by the pitch of the bark peeler, so that some nuance was added to their texture. Using rough-textured materials, such as thatch and log, we tried to create a new characteristics of Yusuhara.

Design Office: Kengo Kuma and associates

Location: Yusuhara, Japan

Photographs: Takumi Ota