House in Ballarat | Moloney Architects

Description by Moloney Architects:

This project is an extension and restoration of a large historic home in central Ballarat (Victoria Australia). The new works extend to from the south side of the existing house, and create a glass connection to the backyard. The roof of the extension is pitched up to the north – with clerestory windows filling the new living spaces with natural light. The different structures are connected via a glazed linkway that clearly differentiates the architectural eras, and allows the old and new designs to sit comfortably side by side.

Design Office: Moloney Architects

Location: Ballarat, Australia

Photographs: Shannon McGrath

House 20 | Jolson Architecture

Description by Jolson Architecture:

House 20 presents a series of blades cantilevering over a bronze wall; pushing and pulling. A grassy knoll rises out of the earth below, being drawn up towards the jostling blades, and partially veiling the building’s elevation and under croft from the street’s vantage point. Below this point of arrival and shelter the offset rhythm and warmth of the bronze wall reveals itself.

Spanning from boundary to boundary, and wrapping within the glazed central entry door, this wall creates a planar datum and threshold of concealment. Beyond this threshold the ground floor interior is a continuum of flowing spatial events, with uninterrupted sight lines into the depth of the dwelling. Bold artworks identify spaces that progress from a formal entry, to formal living and dining, and finally casual living, bookended by a mass fireplace wall. The ground-plane opens up to the north with a series of staggered vertical blade columns which slice and define the programme.  Here exists a tension between the interior and exterior – thresholds becoming blurred, as habitable space nestles within and without, whilst maximizing and controlling northern light, giving shelter, warmth, and continuity of space, continuity of materials.

Connecting the three storey internal volume is a glazed void, a room within a room, drawing through fresh air, light and the open elements. At its base a pond mirrors the sky and cools convecting air. Privacy and direct light are moderated via woven steel mesh, draped within as if the veil from an oversized lantern.

The house rigorously conceals and integrates mechanical, electrical and hydraulic systems. Seamless outcomes have been achieved by close collaboration with structural and services engineers, from earliest design conception to final resolution.

The first floor is the clients private retreat with roof terrace, master suite, library and study. Here the elevated façade can be engaged with at a very intimate level; channelling views out over the grassy knoll to the street’s plane trees.  The contrasting light and dark furniture palette within articulates personality traits of the clients, distinguishing ‘her’ study from ‘his’.

The basement  is half entrenched in the earth and half revealed. Here dark tones sit against slick bodies of water; focusing the sensory experience. A large retractable glass wall disappears to open the pool to the entertainment space , as light emanates from the light well – a grotto for fun, fitness and relaxation.

Design Office: Jolson Architecture

Location: Melbourne, Australia

Photographs: Peter Benetts

Concrete House | Matt Gibson Architecture

Description by Matt Gibson Architecture:

Composed of 2 longitudinal zones located to north & south of an east west spine – living spaces to the north and sleeping/utility spaces to the south, Concrete House utilises vertical connections and void spaces to provide strong visual connections between levels.

Formally simple, lofty and airy, the main spaces are reminiscent of mid century modernist material and compositional qualities (particularly Brazilian modernism).

Vertical and horizontal material connections are woven through the interiors and are composed utilising a purity of volume and geometric form.

The client, a builder and specialist in masonry was keen to utilise a concrete and stone palette externally.

These materials along with a generous utilisation of naturally finished timber became the determining elements of both the houses’ architecture and interior.

These provide a series of haptic textures that effect a powerful contrast against the smooth and more polished nature of glass and steel.

Design Office: Matt Gibson Architecture

Location: Melbourne, Australia

Photographs: Derek Swalwell

Balmoral House | Fox Johnston Architects

Description by Fox Johnston Architects:

The project takes the form of a series of platforms, as buildings responding to the rhythm and topography of the site.

A long linear form to the west contains sleeping areas and bathrooms at the lower level, a garage space at an intermediate level and living areas and media room on the upper level. An elongated pool bounds this form and bleeds into the entry space, forming a shallow pool at the entry courtyard. A cabana is part of the eastern building opening onto a large deck and pool beyond. Above this space is a separate bedroom and bathroom opening onto a deck. Entry to the house is via an open courtyard, leading to a transitional space / lobby area that connects to upper and lower levels at mid way designed to create a gentle change between levels in the building.The upper level roof flips up to the north opening completely onto a north – east facing deck – sliding external walls and screens become part of the eastern face. The lower level bedrooms lead out onto private decks, with direct access to the pool below. Walls open and close, screened to provide privacy or sun control. The buildings narrow width and orientation allows good cross ventilation and sun filtration throughout each space.

Design Office: Fox Johnston Architects

Location: Balmoral, New South Wales, Australia

Photographs: Brett Boardman