Coffou Cottage | Brininstool + Lynch

Coffou Cottage located in Chicago, Usa.

It was designed by Brininstool + Lynch in 2008.

Description by Brininstool + Lynch:

With close proximity to Lake Michigan and a short travel distance from the Chicago, the woods and fields of Southwestern Michigan and Northwestern Indiana have offered Chicagoans weekend reprieves from urban intensity for decades. The owners of this cottage sought to gain a sense of privacy with their vacation property and preferred pastoral views of the natural landscape over views to the lake waters. They were fortunate to find the land that fit their aesthetic aspirations, and subsequently desired a home that would meet their modern concept for living.

This cottage was designed with a simple structural system, a horizontal red cedar rain screen on the North, and a wall of operable glass on the South. The open plan of the kitchen, dining, living area, and porch intensifies views to the meadow and woods to the South while also maximizing solar gain in the winter. Radiant heat in the ground concrete floor is enhanced by passive solar gain and runs throughout the three-bedroom cottage. The arrangement of rooms and glass exterior walls allows for panoramic views of the outdoor environment, while providing the most energy efficient operation. A fireplace positioned in the front hallway divides the bedrooms from the living area, and a custom sofa bench set into the wall across from it creates a traditional fireplace inglenook.

Red cedar was used to establish a material warmth and visual interest on the exterior, using a board and batten-like pattern for an open screen and tongue and groove siding to establish the solid form of the adjacent volume, separated by the entry. The warmth of material and visual identity is continued on the interior—the same wood siding is used on interior walls and cabinets, and the wood rain screen is visible from the screened porch and kitchen window.


Design Office: Brininstool + Lynch
Location: Chicago, Usa
Project Year: 2008
Photographs: Christopher Barrett of Hedrich Blessing


 

Pryor Residence | Bates Masi + Architects

Pryor Residence located in Montauk, New York, Usa.

It was designed by Bates Masi + Architects in 2009.

 

Description by Bates Masi + Architects:

The house occupies a hill in Montauk with a distant view of ocean, a site that the owners, a couple with two young boys, spent years to find. It is the couple’s reprieve from their home in the city, to share the outdoor lifestyle with their family and to remember their teenage years together in Montauk. The house design prompts the owners to interact with the surrounding environment, evoking experiences of camping.
A departure from typical residential planning, the house is entered through multiple areas for different guests and occasions.

Large glass doors slide open to the living, dining and kitchen area for a large gathering; a smaller scaled swing door for an occasional guest opens to the center hall with a view of the ocean. A sequence of auxiliary spaces – beach equipment area, outdoor shower, sand and mudroom – creates a seamless ritual from the daily activities for the family and friends. In all living areas and bedrooms, glass doors and insect screens slide in and out from pocket walls, transforming rooms to screened porches or spaces completely open to the landscape.

The living area, a double height space with kitchen, dining and living area, has thirty-six feet wide glass doors that pocket into southern and northern walls. When open, the dining room becomes a picnic area and the living room fireplace becomes a campfire. Multiple layers of bronzed metal fabric at the clerestory windows in the living area fold and unfold to adjust sunlight for optimal brightness & temperature of the space. These operable architectural elements use the natural environment to create suitable living conditions.

The house is environmentally friendly in its overall construction and planning with such specifics as geo-thermal heating & cooling, shading & venting systems, solar panels, organic finishes and materials. Lending to the structure’s sustainability, the house is assembled, rather than built, with prefabricated foundation, panel siding and efficient built-ins minimizes construction debris or toxins such as concrete foundation tar on the site. With the owner’s initial premise of camping, the design and functionality of the house promotes a memorable experience for friends and family in the natural environment.


Design Office : Bates Masi + Architects
Location          :Montauk, New York, Usa
Area                  : 297,00 m2
Project year     : 2009
Photographs   : Bates Masi + Architects


Karuna House | Holst Architecture

 

Description by Holst Architecture:

Karuna House is an ambitious sustainable design project that was designed to meet a combination of the world’s most demanding green building certifications. The project is the first MINERGIE-certified home in North America, earning the top rating of MINERGIE-P-ECO. Additionally, it has achieved Passive House PHIUS+, is pending LEED for Homes Platinum, and has reached Net Zero energy use by incorporating onsite solar panels. It is expected to be one of the few homes in the world certified by both MINERGIE and Passive House Institute US.

While achieving the environmental sustainability requirements of the project, the home successfully maintains a rigorous form that responds to the client’s programmatic needs. Located on the southern slope of a mountain overlooking the Willamette Valley’s rich wine region, the Karuna House provides spectacular views of the hills and the town of Newberg, Oregon, below. Two towers anchor the Karuna House to the earth, marking the location of double-height spaces and vertical circulation.

Wood and glass volumes appear to alternately cling to and slide past the towers. These elements contain the living spaces, and are arranged to maximize views to the south and east while graciously separating social spaces from the private and guest spaces. Sited in an area famous for its rust-colored soil, the home’s exterior palette is composed of materials and colors that reflect the tones of its surroundings. The interior finishes cast a warm minimalism saturated in natural light, allowing the owner’s eclectic art collection to take center stage.

The super-insulated envelope is designed to be airtight. Solar heat gain is controlled through the use of exterior operable blinds that shade triple-glazed wood windows. Heating, cooling, and hot water are supplied by an efficient heat pump system, and a heat recovery ventilator provides the spaces with a continuous supply of fresh, preheated air. The home’s tight building enclosure is expected to result in the usage of 90% less heating and cooling energy than a typical home.

Karuna House’s client, a leading proponent of smart climate policy and sound land use, is pursuing the project as a case study to shed light on the ways that the leading green building certifications and standards complement and/or conflict with one another

 

Design Office: Holst Architecture

Location: Oregon, Usa

Tribeca Loft | SCARPIDIS

 

Design Office: SCARPIDIS

Location: Tribeca, New York, Usa

Church Conversion | Linc Thelen Design

Design Office: Linc Thelen Design

Location: Chigago, Illinois, Usa

 

Renovation of a 19th century Town House | Mark Zeff Design

Design Office: Mark Zeff Design

Location: New York, Usa

Photographs: Eric Laigne

Aspen Residence | Ro | Rockett Design

Design Office: Ro | Rockett Design

Location: Aspen, Colorado, Usa

New York Home | HGNY

Design Office: HGNY

Location: New York City, Usa

Emerald Star | Dwell Development


Description by Dwell Development :

The combination of reclaimed materials and high performance technology, make the Emerald Star one of the most eco-friendly homes in Seattle.

The home’s exterior siding is reclaimed Douglas Fir and naturally weathered steel roofing panels from a cannery in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, which also act as a protective rain screen. The floors, stairs, and treads were built out of 100-year-old hand sewn mixed hardwoods from Montana creating a stunning combination. Countertops, cabinets and tile made locally from high-recycled content contribute to the home’s impressive inventory of eco-friendly materials.

Design Office: Dwell Development

Location: Seattle, Washington, Usa

Photographs: Tucker English

Lakehouse Residence | [Strang] Architecture

Design Office: [Strang] Architecture

Location: Winter Haven, Florida, Usa

The Mad Park Residence | Vandeventer + Carlander Architects

Description by Vandeventer + Carlander Architects:

The site for this home is a steep slope corner lot in a prestigious neighborhood. Existing site conditions include neighbors to the west and north, a busy arterial below, and a residential street to the east. Though the existing residence was demolished, the previous daylight basement level and existing retaining walls established the datum for the new house.

The program required accommodating a family of six while serving as a platform for entertaining and displaying a growing collection of contemporary art. This dual need of accommodating family and art led to the concept of “served” and “service” zones as the organizational tool for the home’s design. Zoning of functions also permit art and children to live side by side, to be enriched by each other.

The home is comprised of four distinct elements: a glass enclosed main floor living area, a wood wrapped upper bedroom level, a steel sheathed “service” volume to the rear, and a cantilevered, stucco clad office. Fundamental to the concept of the house is a linear, light filled gallery that extends the length of the house. This space separates the “served” from “service” functions on all floors, both in plan and section.

The glass enclosed living area is developed as an open, loft space. Containing traditional entry, living, dining, and family room functions, this space open to patios and gardens on three fully glazed sides. The living area appears as a “void” juxtaposed against the mass of the other volumes.

Private, bedroom areas are defined by the Alaskan Yellow Cedar clad volume above the living area. Three glass bridges, crossing through the linear gallery, give access to the five bedrooms. The bridges and upper hallway provide multiple views of art displayed in the gallery space.

The “service” volume is a two-story enclosure housing the every-day needs of the family: specifically kitchen, mud room, bathrooms, closets, stair, and laundry. Wrapped in rusting steel sheets, the solid nature of the enclosure creates the backdrop to the open nature of the public areas.

The final element, the cantilevered office serves as a sculptural counterpoint to an otherwise rational plan.

Design Office: Vandeventer + Carlander Architects

Location: Seattle, Washington

Photographs: Ben Benschneider

50 Lispenard | SOMA Architects

Description by SOMA Architects:

50 Lispenard is a seven story refurbishment project located in Manhattan’s Tribeca neighborhood. The original building was a garment factory, and is historically protected, thus the extent of the refurbishment was strictly limited to interior improvements, with the exception of a duplex penthouse addition to the roof. The interiors are rich with wood, steel, and concrete, recalling the original industrial function of the building. The duplex penthouse revolves around a double height void and glass bridge overlooking two outdoor roof terraces.

Design Office: SOMA Architects

Location: New York, Usa

Oblio House | Edward Fitzgerald Architects

Description by Edward Fitzgerald Architects:

Oblio House in Cedar Crest’s East Mountains is a study of intersection between circulation and topography.  Built on a steep site, the design organizes the house on two levels that step down the site .  The main entrance is at the upper level. Once inside, circulation doubles back in the opposite direction revealing views of the private natural sanctuary and accessing the guest quarters and study loft.  The lower level is accessed by stairs that are aligned with South Mountain.  This axis intersects the orthogonal geometry of the lower level, living area.  The lower level contains:  open living / dining / kitchen area and the master bedroom suite.  These areas open out onto a terrace that sits within the natural wooded landscape.  The house is constructed of polished concrete floors, insulated concrete forms (ICF), and recycled wood stud framing.  Exterior finishes are stucco and rusted metal roof and wall panels.  The house utilizes passive solar photovoltaic and hot water roof panels for electricity and in-floor heating.  Rain water is collected into underground cisterns for landscape irrigation.

Design Office: Edward Fitzgerald Architects

Location: Cedar Crest, New Mexico, Usa

Photographs: Robert Reck

Miami Modern Home | DKOR Interiors

Design Office: DKOR Interiors

Location: Miami, Florida, Usa

The Mad Park Residence | Vandeventer + Carlander Architects

Description by Vandeventer + Carlander Architects:

The site for this home is a steep slope corner lot in a prestigious neighborhood. Existing site conditions include neighbors to the west and north, a busy arterial below, and a residential street to the east. Though the existing residence was demolished, the previous daylight basement level and existing retaining walls established the datum for the new house.

The program required accommodating a family of six while serving as a platform for entertaining and displaying a growing collection of contemporary art. This dual need of accommodating family and art led to the concept of “served” and “service” zones as the organizational tool for the home’s design. Zoning of functions also permit art and children to live side by side, to be enriched by each other.

The home is comprised of four distinct elements: a glass enclosed main floor living area, a wood wrapped upper bedroom level, a steel sheathed “service” volume to the rear, and a cantilevered, stucco clad office. Fundamental to the concept of the house is a linear, light filled gallery that extends the length of the house. This space separates the “served” from “service” functions on all floors, both in plan and section.

The glass enclosed living area is developed as an open, loft space. Containing traditional entry, living, dining, and family room functions, this space open to patios and gardens on three fully glazed sides. The living area appears as a “void” juxtaposed against the mass of the other volumes.

Private, bedroom areas are defined by the Alaskan Yellow Cedar clad volume above the living area. Three glass bridges, crossing through the linear gallery, give access to the five bedrooms. The bridges and upper hallway provide multiple views of art displayed in the gallery space.

The “service” volume is a two-story enclosure housing the every-day needs of the family: specifically kitchen, mud room, bathrooms, closets, stair, and laundry. Wrapped in rusting steel sheets, the solid nature of the enclosure creates the backdrop to the open nature of the public areas.

The final element, the cantilevered office serves as a sculptural counterpoint to an otherwise rational plan.

Design Office: Vandeventer + Carlander Architects

Location: Seattle, Washington, Usa

Photographs: Benjamin Benschneider