The Pierre | Olson Kundig Architects

 

Description by Olson Kundig Architects:

The owner’s affection for a stone outcropping on her property inspired the design of this house. Conceived as a retreat nestled into the rock, the Pierre (the French word for stone) celebrates the materiality of the site. From certain angles, the house—with its rough materials, encompassing stone, green roof, and surrounding foliage—almost disappears into nature.
With the exception of a separate guest suite, the house functions on one main level, with an open-plan kitchen, dining, and living space. A wood-clad storage box (made with siding reclaimed from a Lionel Pries–designed house) transitions from outside to inside. Its two large bookcases open to provide concealed access to laundry and kitchen storage. A large pivoting steel and glass door provides access to a terrace.
The materiality of the built structure—mild steel, smooth concrete, and drywall—create a neutral backdrop for the interior furnishings and artwork and the exterior views to the bay and surrounding landscape.
Throughout the house, the rock protrudes into the space, contrasting with the luxurious textures of the furnishings. Interior and exterior fireplace hearths are carved out of existing stone; leveled on top, they are otherwise left raw. In the master bathroom, water cascades through three polished pools, natural sinks in the existing stone. Off the main space, a powder room is carved out of the rock; a mirror set within a skytube reflects natural light into the space.

Design Office: Olson Kundig Architects

Location: San Juan Island, Washington, Usa

Photographs: Benjamin Benschneider

House in Kea, Greece | Marina Stassinopoulos – Konstantios Daskalakis

Description:

The characteristic features of the site and the island’s traditional building practices, though without a historicist attitude, are the recognizable project elements: the maintenance of the existing flora, the restructuring of the site’s terracing and the organization of the house with volumes which are either independent or ‘arise’ as intermediate gaps. The building is placed on a terrace. The entrance to the house is found in the void between the volume of the house and the terrace behind it. A longitudinal course, parallel with the gradient of the slope connects the distinct building volumes and three courtyards, each having different characteristics: a covered courtyard (in the heart of the building), a shaded one by the oak trees (close to the living room) and one exposed to the sun (at the end of the corridor). Perpendicular to the longitudinal course one enters the main areas of the building (the living room and the two bedrooms), which open up towards the sea. The circulation and the service spaces (entrance, corridors and bathrooms) are expressed as voids that connect the differing volumes of the primary spaces. The configuration of the flat roof corresponds to the plan of the house, as it depicts the individual volumes and the relationship between them. It is also the main facade of the building since it is exposed in its entirety as one approaches. The roof is formed so as to provide cross ventilation to the main living and sleeping areas and is also set up as a system of collectors that receive and direct the rainwater to the cistern which is the quiet protagonist of the building. The house is constructed with the usual practices of the local builders. Without a decorative intent most surfaces (floors, external walls, internal wet areas) are formed by cement.

Design Office: Marina Stassinopoulos – Konstantios Daskalakis

Location: Kea Island, Cyclades, Greece

Photographs: Yiorgis Yerolympos

GH Mild Home | Archetonic

GH Mild Home is located in Mexico City, Mexico.

It was designed by Archetonic.

Description by Archetonic:

The underlying premise of our design was to enhance the freedom, flexibility, and transformation of the spaces. The design was based on taking advantage of the views towards the gardens that surround the building, the natural light, and the heat gain thanks to its south-easterly orientation.

In addition to availing of the double-height ceilings of the apartment, unusual in a building of this type, we sought to implement a distinct and flexible solution. It is occupied by a young couple who did not want the space to place limits on future family expansion or dynamics. They sought a flexible, ample, and adaptable space.

To achieve this, we settled upon a simple, clean geometry, based around a central corridor as the heart of the open and semi-open spaces, maximizing visual communication throughout the apartment, while retaining the identity of each space.

Along the corridor that links up all the spaces we placed several wooden doors reaching the full height of the space, which slide to vary visibility and establish boundaries between areas. Meanwhile, the layout of the fixed furnishings—custom-designed for the apartment—generates spaces that may be transformed and adapted over time to different habits and dynamics of use.

The materials were selected with the aim of achieving a clean, uniform appearance, with light-toned wood, white stone, and black metalwork, combining perfectly with the artistic contributions of Ulises Gallegos—paintings—and Opioptico—photography—together with a rug that provides warmth to the studio, designed by Déjate Querer.

The apartment occupies a single floor and comprises lobby, lounge, dining room, kitchen, TV room, and three bedrooms. All are naturally well-lit and ventilated spaces thanks to the large windows that expand the space into the outdoors.

Photographs: Rafael Gamo

D House | Marston Architects

Description by Marston Architects:

Set within a heritage conservation area, the original semi has been kept in-tact with its roof line restored. A ‘breezeway’ transition space connects the original house and its new split level contemporary addition, allowing light to filter in to what was otherwise a typical, dark and gloomy south facing house. Connecting the new living space to the rear garden allows a seamless transition from inside to out. A new bedroom suite occupies the upper level of the addition which focuses on balancing light and views with privacy in the dense, urban surrounds.
A skylight adjacent to the northern party wall brings sunlight into the lower level addition, whilst north facing highlight windows bring light into the upstairs bedrooms without compromising the privacy of a bedroom in a dense, urban environment. The new party wall uses the bricks from the previous extension so as waste during construction was minimised.

Design Office: Marston Architects

Location: Sidney, Australia

Photographs: Katherine Lu